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I'll try to explain what I'm trying to do with an example:

Number = ["1","9","7"]  

So I want it to return:

[["1","9","7"],["9","7","1"],["7","1","9"]]  

What I get is:

[["7","1","9"],["7","1","9"],["7","1","9"]]

For some obscure reason it replaces my first results with the last one.

def Get_Rotations(Number):
    Rotations = []
    x = 0
    while x < len(Number):
        Number.insert(0,Number.pop())
        Rotations.append(Number)
        x += 1
    print(Rotations)
    return Rotations  
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to create copies of Number. You are manipulating the same list in each iteration and append that list three times to Rotations. Therefor you see three times Number in it's "end state".

Rotations.append(list(Number))

That minor change should do the trick! ;-)

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It does indeed, ty! But I don't understand why your solution works :s Why do you state use list on Number which already is a list? –  Daquicker Dec 9 '11 at 22:16
    
list(...) is used to create a copy of Number. It's not used as type conversion! Otherwise you would just add a reference to Number. I would propose that you do the print(Rotations) inside the while loop. The output will probably make everything clear to you in the split of a second. ;-) –  Achim Dec 9 '11 at 22:20
2  
from copy import copy ... Rotations.append(copy(Number)) is much clearer. –  rubergly Dec 10 '11 at 3:08

When you're doing Rotations.append(Number), you're not copying Number, you're adding a reference to Number. All three of the indices in Rotations are pointing to the same object (basically like Rotations = [Number, Number, Number]), so changing Number will affect all three outputs.

Instead, create a new array, fill it with the contents of Number, and add it to Rotations.

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Just want to suggest completely different solution.

from collections import deque

number = ['1', '9', '7']

rotator = deque(number)
rotations = [number]

for _i in range(len(number) - 1):
    rotator.rotate()
    rotations += [list(rotator)]

print(rotations)

Note that this solution is much more efficient.

Also you may or may not want to have rotator to be in the initial state after this code block run. Than you may edit this code into following

from collections import deque

number = ['1', '9', '7']

rotator = deque(number)
rotations = []

for _i in range(len(number)):
    rotations += [list(rotator)]
    rotator.rotate()

print(rotations)

Now rotator will be in initial number state. The code is a little easier to understand but you've got +1 cycle in for.

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1  
+1 for using deque and rotate method. –  ovgolovin Dec 10 '11 at 10:08

First Let me give you the correct answer

def Get_Rotations(Number):
    Rotations = []
    x = 0
    while len(Number):
        Rotations.append(Number.pop())
    print(Rotations)
    return Rotations

>>> Number = ["1","9","7"]
>>> Get_Rotations(Number)
['7', '9', '1']
['7', '9', '1']

Now in your case, you were doing few things wrong

  1. You were popping the Number and always inserting at the beginning.
  2. Inserting a List within a List

Do you know you can do this in a much easier way?

Number[::-1]

>>> Number[::-1]
['7', '9', '1']
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The reasons why you code doesn't work are very well explained in the other answers.

I want to point one more thing.

Insertions at the beginning of the list are quite costly. You use them here Number.insert(0,...) They have O(n) complexity (appendings are actually O(1)).

Bellow I'll show another way to do the same thing using iterators which just loop over the list with some shifts:

from itertools import cycle, islice

def rotate(L):
    ln = len(L)
    it = cycle(iter(L)) #create an overall iterator
    for _ in range(ln): #there are len(L) output lists
        yield list(islice(it,3)) #slice next 3 elements, for a list and yield the rusult
        it.next() #skip one element to start a new list shifted by one

rotate is a generator which is used to create an iterator which will yield the needed lists.

cycle and islice is from here.

Example of usage:

for el in rotate(Number):
    print el

Output:

['1', '9', '7']
['9', '7', '1']
['7', '1', '9']

Or just using list constructor:

print(list(rotate(Number)))

Output:

[['1', '9', '7'], ['9', '7', '1'], ['7', '1', '9']]
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