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Okay, so I'm trying to parse a file that outputs in columns what I need in rows, and I can't get this while loop to work, and I'm really stumped.

Interestingly, doing almost the exact same thing with a for loop does work. Can someone please explain what's going on here?

This...

e=""
for f in 1 2 3
do 
    echo $f 
    e="$e.$f"
done
echo $e

Outputs:

1
2
3
.1.2.3

But this...

e=""
echo "1
2
3" | while read f
do 
    echo $f 
    e="$e.$f"
done
echo $e

Outputs:

1
2
3

Clearly both loops have 1, 2, or 3 in $f when they get to e="$e.$f", so what the heck is going on that the second one doesn't work?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I can't tell you how many times I've had to pull this bug out of someone's code.

Basically the pipe generates a forked process. e is set in the forked process, but when that terminates (at the end of the wile loop) the parent process does not know that e has changed. In short, never set a variable in a command involving a pipe. It will not be set when the pipe finishes. Shorter... Don't use pipes if they can be avoided.

e=''
while read f
do
  echo $f
  e="$e.$f"
done << EOF
1
2
3
EOF
echo $e
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Awesome, thanks! My second question was going to be "how do I fix it?" –  Chriszuma Dec 9 '11 at 22:26

pipe will be executed in a sub-shell. so the variable e was not changed after the piped command execution.

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Interesting, I had no idea. –  Chriszuma Dec 9 '11 at 22:25
    
yes, even if you export in while loop, the var cannot be "pushed" to father shell either. –  Kent Dec 9 '11 at 22:31

As the while read... done is part of a pipeline, it gets its own forked process image just like other binaries (that's called a subshell). (The confusing part is that it's written in shell, but nevertheless it isn't executed as part of the current shell process.) That's why the variables won't get updates.

as a workaround, you can alway do something like this (uses bashisms):

while read line
do
    blablabla
done < <(echo "1 2 3")

Here, you avoid setting up a pipeline, and so the while...done shell code is executed as part of your current script.

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+1 for showing me a new notation. I've never seen <() before. –  Chriszuma Dec 9 '11 at 22:28
    
That's called process substitution and is not very portable (but can be simulated by creating a temporary file) –  Jo So Dec 9 '11 at 22:30

I'm guessing this is a difference in the scope of the variables. When you pipe your echo statement into the while statement, the global e is not in its scope, so it prints the f and sets a new variable e. When the while loop exits, the global e has not changed. Hence your statement echo $e prints nothing.

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Pipes have their own local scope? 0_o –  Chriszuma Dec 9 '11 at 22:15
    
It's sort of you like the echo is a forked process and returns nothing. It is a child process and gets a new scope. If you could pass the e as a reference to the command, it would update the globally accessible e. –  Furbeenator Dec 9 '11 at 22:17

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