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In a unit test I am overwriting a config file to test handling bad property values. I am using Apache Commons IO:

org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.copyFile(new File(configDir, "xyz.properties.badValue"), new File(configDir, "xyz.properties"), false)

When investigating the file system I can see that xyz.properties is in fact overwritten - size is updated and the content is the same as that of xyz.properties.badValue.

When I complete the test case which goes through code that reads the file into a Properties object (using a FileReader object) I get the properties of the original xyz.properties file, not the newly copied version.

Through debugging where I single step and investigate the file I can rule out it being a timing issue of writing to the file system.

Does the copy step somehow hold a file handle? If so how would I release it again? If not, does anybody have any idea why this happens and how to resolve it?

Thanks.

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The copy method closes all handles appropriately; without further info it may be difficult to assist. Do you have a minimal test case that can reproduce the error? –  Dave Newton Dec 9 '11 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

If you initialized the FileReader object before this object, then it will have already stored a temp copy of the old version.

You'll need to reset it:

FileReader f = new FileReader("the.file");

// Copy and overwrite "the.file"

f = new FileReader("the.file");

In the Unix filesystem model, the inode containing the file's contents will persist as long as someone has an open filehandle into the file, or there is a directory entry pointing to it.

Replacing the file's name in the directory, does not remove the inode (contents of the file), so your already-open filehandle can continue to be used.

This is actually exploitable to create temporary files that never need to be cleaned up: create the file, then unlink it immediately, while keeping it open. When you close the file handle, the inode is reaped

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… because in the Unix filesystem model, the inode containing the file's contents will persist as long as someone has an open filehandle into the file, or there is a directory entry pointing to it. Replacing the file's name in the directory, does not remove the inode (contents of the file), so your already-open filehandle can continue to be used. This is actually exploitable to create temporary files that never need to be cleaned up: create the file, then unlink it immediately, while keeping it open. When you close the file handle, the inode is reaped. –  BRPocock Dec 9 '11 at 22:32

I realize that this doesn't answer your question directly, but I think that it would be better to maintain two separate files, and arrange for your code to have the name of the configuration file configurable / injected at runtime. That way, your tests can specify which config file to use, rather than overwriting a single file.

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