Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any reason to prefer one of these methods of implementing a global exception handler in a Windows Forms application over the other?

First Method

static void Main(string[] args) 
{
    try
    {
        System.Windows.Forms.Application.Run(mainform);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log error and display error message
    }
}

Second Method

static void Main(string[] args) 
{
    System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadException += 
        new ThreadExceptionEventHandler(Application_ThreadException);
    System.Windows.Forms.Application.Run(mainform);
}

static void Application_ThreadException(object sender, ThreadExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    // Log error and display error message
}

Does handling the ThreadException event give you something that the try / catch doesn't?

share|improve this question
    
The First Method doesn't even work in Release mode, i.e. when you run your exe this will be an Unhandled exception, and you will NOT reach the catch block; only works while using visual studio. Try it, put a button inside your mainform and throw an exception there. –  joedotnot May 17 '12 at 11:38
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My understanding of this behavior is that adding a ThreadException handler will cause otherwise unhandled exceptions in forms to be caught and processed by this handler, which will allow the application to continue running.

In your try/catch design, the first unhandled exception in a form will cause the application to halt. You will catch the exception, but the application will then come to an end.

Note that there is also an AppDomain.UnhandledException event that will be raised in certain cases (unhandled exceptions in threads other than the main windows forms thread and not catching the ThreadException), all of which are very bad news for your app.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah thanks, that's actually pretty obvious now that you point it out. Thanks for your help. –  kevev22 Dec 9 '11 at 23:02
add comment

The event handler approach allows your app to catch the exception, try to recover from it and continue. (i.e. execution does not leave Application.Run)

A try/catch in main will catch the exception but you will have left Application.Run at which point about all you can do is exit.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your help. I would give you the check but the other answer had you beat by 8 seconds. –  kevev22 Dec 9 '11 at 23:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.