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This is my current code:

var PermissionsChecker = {};

PermissionsChecker.check = function(id) {
  PermissionsChecker.getPermissions(id);
}

PermissionsChecker.getPermissions = function(id) {
  // do stuff
}

Two questions:

  1. Is this the right way to construct node.js functions?
  2. Is that line in .check the correct way to refer to a sibling function?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's perfectly fine. Some notes:

  • Sibling function isn't really any standard term for methods of the same object. Minor note, but could cause confusion.
  • When a function is called as a method on some object, then the value of this inside that function refers to the object on which it was called. That is, calling check like this:

    PermissionsChecker.check()
    

    ...allows you to write the function like this:

    PermissionsChecker.check = function(id) {
        this.getPermissions(id);
    }
    

    ...which is more succinct and probably more common.

  • Nothing about your question is specific to node.js. This applies to JavaScript in the browser (or anywhere else), too.

  • You could save some typing by rewriting your example like this:

    var PermissionsChecker = {
        check: function(id) {
            this.getPermissions(id);
        },
        getPermissions: function(id) {
            // do stuff
        }
    };
    
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Totally right on all counts. Thank you! –  Filo Stacks Dec 9 '11 at 23:09

So long as the function is called with PermissionsChecker.check(), you can refer to the object with this.

CodePad.

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Thank you very much, especially for putting an example up. –  Filo Stacks Dec 9 '11 at 23:09

What you've done above is called an object literal, but you could choose the prototypal way also (when you need to instantiate objects - OOP stuff).

You can call this inside to refer to another object property:

PermissionsChecker.check = function(id) {
  this.getPermissions(id);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much for that. I ended up doing that. –  Filo Stacks Dec 9 '11 at 23:09

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