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disclaimer: I'm pretty sure I've managed to muck up something really simple, possibly because I've been poking at this in between "real work" while waiting for some slow C++ builds, so my head's not in the right place.

In looking at What's the most efficient way of generating all possible combinations of skyrim (PC Game) potions? I had the naïve notion that it would be a really, really simple recursive filter in Lisp to generate all combinations of size "n." The answer given there, in R, is elegant and shows off the language well, but that combn(list,n) method caught my attention. ( http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/utils/html/combn.html )

(defun combn (list n)
  (cond ((= n 0) nil)
        ((null list) nil)
        ((= n 1) (mapcar #'list list))
        (t (mapcar #'(lambda (subset) (cons (car list) subset))
                   (combn (cdr list) (1- n))))))

(combn '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9) 3)

((1 2 3) (1 2 4) (1 2 5) (1 2 6) (1 2 7) (1 2 8) (1 2 9))

Except, this just returns the first set of combinations … I can't wrap my head around what's wrong, precisely. It seems that the (= n 1) case works right, but the t case should be doing something differently, such as stripping (1 2) off the list and repeating?

So, my attempt to fix it, got nastier:

 (defun combn (list n)
  (cond ((= n 0) nil) ((= n 1) (mapcar #'list list))
        ((null list) nil)
        (t (cons (mapcar #'(lambda (subset) (cons (car list) subset))
                         (combn (cdr list) (1- n)))
                 (combn (cdr list) n)))))

which is wrong at the point of (t cons(… I think. But, if cons is the wrong answer, I'm not sure what is right…? (Reduced to using 2 to demonstrate output…)

(combn '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9) 2)
(((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (1 5) (1 6) (1 7) (1 8) (1 9))
 ((2 3) (2 4) (2 5) (2 6) (2 7) (2 8) (2 9))
 ((3 4) (3 5) (3 6) (3 7) (3 8) (3 9))
 ((4 5) (4 6) (4 7) (4 8) (4 9))
 ((5 6) (5 7) (5 8) (5 9))
 ((6 7) (6 8) (6 9))
 ((7 8) (7 9))
 ((8 9))
  NIL)

… which appears to be right, except for the extraneous nesting and the bonus NIL at the end. (I had anticipated that ((null list) nil) would have filtered that out?)

What did I do wrong? :-(

(And, also, is there a standard routine for doing this more efficiently?)

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oh, and (disassemble) already reminded me I should use (zerop) instead of (= n 0). Yay, optimizing compilers. I'll figure this stuff out, sooner or later :-D –  BRPocock Dec 9 '11 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, the cons is not the right thing, you need an append. And that's also what gets you the NIL at the end. I can't write Lisp, so I'll give you Haskell:

comb :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
comb 0 _ = [[]]
comb k (x:xs) = [x:ys | ys <- comb (k-1) xs] ++ comb k xs
comb _ _ = []

That's short and sweet, but inefficient (and doesn't check for negative k). It will often try to choose more elements than the list has for a long time. To prevent that, one would keep track of how many elements are still available.

comb :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
comb 0 _ = [[]]
comb k xs
  | k < 0     = []
  | k > len   = []
  | k == len  = [xs]
  | otherwise = go len k xs
    where
      len = length xs
      go l j ys
        | j == 1 = map (:[]) ys
        | l == j = [ys]
        | otherwise = case ys of
                        (z:zs) -> [z:ws | ws <- go (l-1) (j-1) zs] ++ go (l-1) j zs

Ugly, but efficient.

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d'oh. That'd exactly it. (t (append ( and the rest is butter. And, just for fun, I changed ((= n 0) nil) to ((< n 1) nil), just for paranoia. Thanks… –  BRPocock Dec 9 '11 at 23:35

A solution using Common Lisp.

Note that this depends on 2 non-standard functions which i'm not including here: take and drop.

take would return the first n elements of a list drop would return everything in a list except the first n elements

I'd also note that this version intentionally throws an error if the list passed in isn't evenly divisible by the specified number but it'd be easy enough to have it just place any "leftover" items in a shorter list at the end.

Both of these come from scheme's srfi-1

; "Public: split-by
; splits an list into multiple lists of n length.
;
; Parameters:
;  * n - the size of the lists it should be broken into.
;  * lst - the list to be split
;
; Returns:
; A list of smaller list of the specified length (or raises an exception).
;
; Examples:
;    (split-by 2 '(1 2 3 4)) ; => ((1 2) (3 4))
;    (split-by 2 '(1 2 3)) ; => not evenly divisible error"

(defun split-by (n lst)
   (let ( (list-size (length lst)) )
     (if (not (eq 0 (mod list-size n)))
       (error (format nil "list is not evenly divisible by ~A: ~A" n lst)))
     (if (not (eq list-size 0))
         (cons (take lst n) (split-by n (drop lst n)))
         '() )))

P.S. I can't claim credit for this. This algorithm's been floating around Scheme land for a while.

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