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given my data is:

2011-12-31 01:00:00

what easy and quick script can I use to exctract simply: "DEC 31" ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

http://www.datejs.com/ is nice for this

Using it the code would be like (tested and works)

Date.parse('2011-12-31 01:00:00').toString("MMM d"); // "Dec 31"

This solution is wonderful because datajs is a very flexible library.

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Create the following helper functions:

function getMonthName(d) {
    var m = ['January','February','March','April','May','June','July',
        'August','September','October','November','December'];
    return m[d.getMonth()];
}

function getShortMonthName(d) {
    return getMonthName(d).substring(0, 3).toUpperCase();
}

And use them like this:

var s = "2011-12-31 01:00:00".split(/-|\s+|:/);
// new Date(year, month, day [, hour, minute, second, millisecond ])
var d = new Date(s[0], s[1] - 1, s[2], s[3], s[4], s[5]);

getShortMonthName(d) + " " + d.getDate();

Output:

"DEC 31"
share|improve this answer
    
Parse the string, to construct a date, just to get back the strings? Seems like too many steps to me. –  gilly3 Dec 10 '11 at 0:29
    
Sure, you could simply output: getShortMonthName(s[1] - 1) + " " + s[2]; (after modifying getMonthName to use its input as the index). I'd guess that in most cases you'll actually end up needing the Date object, but it's not strictly necessary for this simple example. (Also, a nice side-effect of converting the pieces into a proper Date is that we get nice names for things.) –  lwburk Dec 10 '11 at 0:33

This can do it. Just pass the string as a parameter to the date object and split the dateString. Concatenate and you're done :)

var n = new Date("2011-12-31 01:00:00");
var d = n.toDateString().split(" ");
var formattedDate = d[1].toUpperCase() + " " + d[2];

or optionally as a function

function getFormattedDate(dateString) {
    var n = new Date(dateString);
    var d = n.toDateString().split(" ");
    return d[1].toUpperCase() + " " + d[2];
}

var formattedDate = getFormattedDate("2011-12-31 01:00:00"); // returns "DEC 31"
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A function that would do exactly what you asked for (and nothing more):

function toMonthAndDay(dateString) {
    var months = ['JAN','FEB','MAR','APR','MAY','JUN','JUL','AUG','SEP','OCT','NOV','DEC'];
    var dateParts = dateString.split(/[- ]/);
    return months[+dateParts[1]] + " " + dateParts[2];
}

But, to take any date and output it in any custom format, I wrote a function that is loosely based on .Net DateTime format strings:

Date.prototype.format = function (format)
{
    var MMMM = ["\u0000", "January", "February", "March", "April", "May", "June", "July", "August", "September", "October", "November", "December"];
    var MMM = ["\u0001", "Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", "May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"];
    var dddd = ["\u0002", "Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday"];
    var ddd = ["\u0003", "Sun", "Mon", "Tue", "Wed", "Thu", "Fri", "Sat"];
    function ii(i, len) { var s = i + ""; len = len || 2; while (s.length < len) s = "0" + s; return s; }

    var y = this.getFullYear();
    format = format.replace(/yyyy+/g, y);
    format = format.replace(/yy/g, y.toString().substr(2, 2));
    format = format.replace(/y/g, y);

    var M = this.getMonth() + 1;
    format = format.replace(/MMMM+/g, MMMM[0]);
    format = format.replace(/MMM/g, MMM[0]);
    format = format.replace(/MM/g, ii(M));
    format = format.replace(/M/g, M);

    var d = this.getDate();
    format = format.replace(/dddd+/g, dddd[0]);
    format = format.replace(/ddd/g, ddd[0]);
    format = format.replace(/dd/g, ii(d));
    format = format.replace(/d/g, d);

    var H = this.getHours();
    format = format.replace(/HH+/g, ii(H));
    format = format.replace(/H/g, H);

    var h = H > 12 ? H - 12 : H == 0 ? 12 : H;
    format = format.replace(/hh+/g, ii(h));
    format = format.replace(/h/g, h);

    var m = this.getMinutes();
    format = format.replace(/mm+/g, ii(m));
    format = format.replace(/m/g, m);

    var s = this.getSeconds();
    format = format.replace(/ss+/g, ii(s));
    format = format.replace(/s/g, s);

    var f = this.getMilliseconds();
    format = format.replace(/fff+/g, ii(f, 3));
    f = Math.round(f / 10);
    format = format.replace(/ff/g, ii(f));
    f = Math.round(f / 10);
    format = format.replace(/f/g, f);

    var T = H < 12 ? "AM" : "PM";
    format = format.replace(/TT+/g, T);
    format = format.replace(/T/g, T.charAt(0));

    var t = T.toLowerCase();
    format = format.replace(/tt+/g, t);
    format = format.replace(/t/g, t.charAt(0));

    var day = this.getDay() + 1;
    format = format.replace(new RegExp(dddd[0], "g"), dddd[day]);
    format = format.replace(new RegExp(ddd[0], "g"), ddd[day]);

    format = format.replace(new RegExp(MMMM[0], "g"), MMMM[M]);
    format = format.replace(new RegExp(MMM[0], "g"), MMM[M]);

    return format;
};

Usage:

new Date("2011-12-31 01:00:00".replace(/-/g, "/")).format("MMM d"); // returns Dec 31

Note that IE doesn't recognize "2011-12-31 01:00:00" as a valid date string. You have to replace the dashes with slashes. To get DEC instead of Dec, you'd have to call .toUpperCase().

The differences from .Net custom date format strings are:

  • You can make AM/PM uppercase or lowercase by using TT or tt respectively
  • Using \ as an escape character is not (yet) implemented.
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This should work:

var date = "2011-12-31 01:00:00";

var day = date.substring(8, 10);

var month = parseInt(date.substring(5, 7));
switch(month) {
    case 1:     month="JAN";break;
    case 2:     month="FEB";break;
    case 3:     month="MAR";break;
    case 4:     month="APR";break;
    case 5:     month="MAY";break;
    case 6:     month="JUN";break;
    case 7:     month="JUL";break;
    case 8:     month="AUG";break;
    case 9:     month="SEP";break;
    case 10:    month="OCT";break;
    case 11:    month="NOV";break;
    case 12:    month="DEC";break;
}


alert(month + " " + day);
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2  
Please, use an array of month abbreviations instead of a switch statement. –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 10 '11 at 0:01
    
Yeah, I suppose I could of. Still, it's quick and simple ;) –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 10 '11 at 0:05

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