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I have a problem using the STL containers in c++

function 1;

void addStudent(const Student &s){                       
    set<GradeColumn>::iterator itr;

    for(itr = gradeColumns.begin(); itr != gradeColumns.end(); itr++){
        itr->addStudent(s, DID_NOT_COMPLETE);
    }
}

function 2:

void addStudent(const Student &s,  int grade) const {
    column.insert(pair<Student, int>(s, grade));
}

Okay, so in function 1 I use addStudent, but the compiler gives me an error unless I declare addStudent as a const function (the error is "The object has type qualifiers that are not compatible with the member function").

But if I do declare addStudent as a const function, then column.insert(...) gives me thee next error: "No instance of overloaded function matches the argument list and object 9the object has type qualifiers that prevent a match)".

Is there any way to fix that? Am I missing something?

Thanks!

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Please show us relevant code: operator< or std::less<GradeColumn>. Can addStudent change GradeColumn order? –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 2:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem here is that the class you are trying to modify is also the key in the set. And this is required to be immutable. i.e. it is not correct behaviour to change the key once the item is in the set.

You need to consider a different structure, I would advice that you extract the key element out into a separate key structure and use a map to map the key to the mutable data content of your structure.

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I would advise that you do not change your whole design just because of a design error in std::std. It is common to have the key packed inside a record (database line) and safe as long as you know what you are doing. With multiple keys it is not even possible to keep the key out in general. –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 3:21
    
@curiousguy, well, it's easier to get it wrong than to get it right, and at the start, it's better to work with the standard than to hack around it. –  Nim Dec 10 '11 at 11:40
    
"it's better to work with the standard" Working with std::set safe-for-babies design means either sticking to very simple uses, or hacking around the C++ language (notably dropping const-correctness) or hacking around the std::set<>::value_type constness. Working "against" std::set is easier and cleaner. What we really need is access to the sane rbtree interface hidden behind the "safe" sugar-coated set/map/multiset/multimap interfaces. –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 17:14
    
@curiousguy, not everyone is at the same level as you, and nor do they have the same requirements. The standard libraries are designed for the general case, and for the general case, they are hard to beat. I'm not convinced your strategy will work for beginners, and I would caution against recommending it. If it would work, all known C++ literature would take that approach - they don't, it's for a reason. –  Nim Dec 10 '11 at 19:53
    
"not everyone is at the same level as you" Yes, and no everyone knows how to properly deal with the castrated std::set interface. "The standard libraries are designed for the general case, and for the general case, they are hard to beat." For the general case, you need the internal rbtree interface. Only in quite simple cases can you use the set/map interface in a natural and easy way. "I'm not convinced your strategy will work for beginners" Which strategy? The one I am suggesting in my answer? –  curiousguy Dec 12 '11 at 0:44

The keys of a std::set are always constant. This is a requirement of the container, since the elements are ordered by key value, and if keys were mutable, the container couldn't guarantee that its invariants are maintained.

If your relational operator on GradeColumn is independent of the things you need to access in your insert() member function, then you can declare those member objects mutable so that you can modify them even when the key object itself is constant.

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How do I declare them mutable so that will work? I've tried every option that I could think of. –  GMan Dec 10 '11 at 1:08
    
"This is a requirement of the container" No, it is a (bad) design choice. "the container couldn't guarantee that its invariants are maintained." Actually it can't. It's the responsibility of the user. –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 2:35
    
curiousguy, I believe you're mistaken. Those are requirements of set, from the C++ standard. @KerrekSB: instead of recommending mutable, maybe you should recommend a different container instead? I lived to regret every time I typed mutable. –  Mooing Duck Dec 10 '11 at 3:26
    
@GMan: Why don't you post your class definition, and we can take a look. –  Kerrek SB Dec 10 '11 at 13:27
    
@MooingDuck "curiousguy, I believe you're mistaken. Those are requirements of set, from the C++ standard." As I said, that the elements are const is the result of a bad design choice for the interface of std::set. And the standard requirement for a container was that the elements are assignable, so the first C++ standard actually required the element for all containers to be non-const (and for std::set to be const). So associative containers were not even implementable in C++ "98". –  curiousguy Dec 10 '11 at 17:29

The answer depends on your answer to my comment. If your answer is:

"yes, addStudent can change GradeColumn order"

The answer is: Associative containers design saved you as explained in other answers.

"no, addStudent cannot change GradeColumn order"

The answer is: Associative containers design strikes again.

The fix is (sketch):

class GradeColumnElement {
    mutable GradeColumn col;

    friend bool operator<(const GradeColumnElement& left, const GradeColumnElement& right) {
        return left.col < right.col;
    }

public:
    GradeColumnElement (const GradeColumn& col) : col(col) {
    }

    // const interface: 
    // modifications of GradeColumn that do NOT affect ordering
    void addStudent(const Student &s, int grade) const {
        col.addStudent (s, grade);
    }
};

then you use set<GradeColumnElement> instead of set<GradeColumn>.

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Hi, first of all, thanks a lot, and the answer is that addStudent can't change GradeColumn. I'll have to understand what exactly you did here, but I believe this will work. Thanks! Will report back tomorrow. –  GMan Dec 10 '11 at 3:41
1  
Why the unexplained downvote? –  curiousguy Dec 11 '11 at 19:24

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