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Ok so I get this code to do the averaging : (written in C )

.
.
        int sum[3];
        int j;
        int avg;
      for(;;) //infinite loop
      {
       for(j=0;j<3;j++){
        i = ReadSensor(); // function that keeps saving sensor values as int i
        sum[j]=i;
        }
       avg=sum[0]+sum[1]+sum[2]+sum[3]; 
       printf("Sonar: %d \r \n", avg >> 2);
      }
.
.

Is this correct ? im shifting by 2 to divide by avg / 2^(2) which is 4 The problem is im expecting a value of about 15, however I get about 8--9 .. Im not sure why this is happening ?

Basically the sensor's readings fluctuate between 15-17, I want to get an average instead of printing noise values. Is my code correct ? Then why do I get wrong outputs !?

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1  
Langauge? Add as a tag – Jon Dec 10 '11 at 0:07
1  
While it's true that using shift is an efficient way to divide by powers of two, you should note that virtually any modern compiler will automatically take care of this substitution, giving the same performance as if you wrote the more obvious avg/2 – TJD Dec 10 '11 at 0:35
    
Thank you, I will then just use the divide operator. – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:45
    
@TJD Some embedded C compilers have limited optimization. Fendi, what compiler are you going to compile with? What hardware are you going to run this on (PC, PIC, AVR, Arduino, etc)? Add these as tags too. – Nick Alexeev Dec 10 '11 at 3:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The number of values read from sensor is required twice. First, to control the number of iterations of for loop. Second, as the divisor of sum. Introduce a variable (say, N) to capture that.

Also, the division by shifting does not sound right, because that restricts the number of readings from the sensor to power of two.

enum { N = 4 };

sum = 0;
for( j = 0; j < N; j++) {
   i = ReadSensor(); // function that keeps saving sensor values as int i
   sum += i;
}
avg = sum / N; 
printf( "Sonar average: %d\n", avg );
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, I will try this when I get to the lab. The reason im shifting is because the micro controller does not like division, multiplication, float numbers etc .. So using bitwise operators is preferred. But what do you mean by "estricts the number of readings from the sensor to power of two." anyway ? – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:34
2  
@Fendi: Bit shifting in order to divide means that you can only divide by 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc - all powers of 2. You can't simply bit shift in order to divide by 5 - that's what ArunSaha is saying. You can however, bit shift and subtract to divide by 5, so you can make do without using a division instruction. – AusCBloke Dec 10 '11 at 0:41
    
Oh I see thank you for explaining .. But I only need to divide by 4, so for this case its alright. – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:44

Looks like your script only captures three values (j=0, j=1, j=2), then divides by four.

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OH !! it should be for(j=0;j<=3;j++) ?! – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:19
2  
or for(j=0;j<4;j++) which is how it is normally written. either way – Dan Dec 10 '11 at 0:31
    
Ok thank you. I will try all the answers here and mark the best one as correct. – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:44

You have a few problems, here are some suggestions:

  • You're iterating through the inside loop 3 times, however you're saying you have 4 sensors, you should change your for loop to: for (j = 0; j < 4; j++).
  • sum is an array of 3 elements, yet you're accessing an element 1 past the end of the array when calculating avg (sum[3]). This will cause undefined behaviour. sum should be declared as char sum[4] for this reason and the one above.
  • (Optional) sum does not need to be an array in the above example, it can simply be an int.
  • (Optional) If you want to divide an int by 4, use the division operator. The compiler should be better at optimizing the code for your particular architecture than you.

This is how your code could now look, depending on whether you need to keep an array or not:

int sum[4];
int total, j;

for (;;)
{    
   total = 0; /* reset at every iteration of the outside loop */   

   for (j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
      sum[i] = ReadSensor();
      total += sum[i];
   }

   printf("Sonar: %d \r \n", total / 4);
}

OR

int total, j;

for (;;)
{    
   total = 0; /* reset at every iteration of the outside loop */   

   for (j = 0; j < 4; j++)
      total += ReadSensor();

   printf("Sonar: %d \r \n", total / 4);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, I will try this as soon as I get to the lab. – NLed Dec 10 '11 at 0:34

Isn't this

avg=sum[0]+sum[1]+sum[2]+sum[3];

should be

avg=sum[0]+sum[1]+sum[2];

as the loop as well declaration int sum[3]; means we are trying to store only 3 values.

Now if you want 4 and ok with divide operator. There are the new code which should replace the mentioned lines

int sum[4];

for(j=0;j<4;j++)

avg=sum[0]+sum[1]+sum[2]+sum[3]; // this part stays the same
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