Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got two arrays in my bash, each containing files. In my loop, sometimes a file gets deleted. Whenever that happens, one of the arrays shows the old state, the other one shows the new state. How do I manage to show the difference between them, e. g. which file exactly got deleted? By the way, there is no other way to find out.

Here's an example:

arr_a=( file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt )
arr_b=( file1.txt file3.txt )

#Now the output should be file2.txt

I imagined something lile echo ${arr_a[@]#arr_b[@]}, but this didn't work. (This results in arr_a being output entirely.)

share|improve this question
1  
Are the arrays always in the same sequence with only elements deleted, or can elements also be added? –  Daenyth Dec 10 '11 at 0:25
    
I think you might have to resort to nested for loops on this one. –  couling Dec 10 '11 at 0:50
    
No addition, only deletion, just like in the example –  MechMK1 Dec 10 '11 at 1:10
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This one is a bit complicated but will work in the case the arrays don't maintain correlativity. It sorts all elements of the larger array to correlate to those in the shorter array, and then prints the remaining elements in the larger array (it works on copies of the arrays). Not fully tested:

#!/bin/bash
arr_a=( file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt )
arr_b=( file1.txt file3.txt )

sortarr() {
    local sorted=( ${!1} ) sortby=( ${!2} )
    local length=${#sorted[@]} i=${#sortby} matches
    while (( i-- )); do
        [[ ! "${sorted[@]}" =~ ${sortby[$i]} ]] && continue
        sorted=( ${sorted[@]//$BASH_REMATCH/} )
        printf -v matches '%*s' $(( $length - ${#sorted[@]} ))
        sorted=( ${matches// /$BASH_REMATCH }${sorted[@]} )
    done
    for (( i=${#sortby[@]}; i<${#sorted[@]}; i++ )); do
        echo ${sorted[$i]}
    done
}

if (( ${#arr_a[@]} > ${#arr_b[@]} )); then
    sortarr arr_a[@] arr_b[@]
else
    sortarr arr_b[@] arr_a[@]
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Worked like a charm. Thanks a lot. I'll modify this further for my needs. Thank you again –  MechMK1 Dec 10 '11 at 0:52
add comment

@David: What you basically need is the difference between two sets. This can be done much more easily using a little bit of python as shown in Method-0 below. Method-1 and 2 are just two variations using Bash indexed and sparse array. Output for each of the following methods is file2.txt

Method-0:

#!/bin/bash

arr_a=( file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt )
arr_b=( file1.txt file3.txt )

echo -e "${arr_a[@]} \n ${arr_b[@]}" | python -c '\
    a=set(raw_input().strip().split());\
    b=set(raw_input().strip().split());\
    (x,y)=(a,b) if len(a)>len(b) else (b,a);\
    print "".join(list(x-y));'

Method-1:

#!/bin/bash

arr_a=( file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt )
arr_b=( file1.txt file3.txt )
i=0

for a in ${arr_a[@]}
do
    AinB=0
    for b in ${arr_b[@]}
    do
        if [[ $a == $b ]]
        then
            AinB=1
        fi
    done

    if [[ AinB -eq 0 ]]
    then
        arr_c[$((i++))]=$a
    fi
done

echo ${arr_c[@]}

Method-2:

#!/bin/bash

arr_a="file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt"
arr_b="file1.txt file3.txt"
arr_c=""

for a in $arr_a
do
    isPresentInB=0
    for b in $arr_b
    do
        if [[ $a == $b ]]
        then
            isPresentInB=1
            break
        fi
    done

    if [[ $isPresentInB -eq 0 ]]
    then
        arr_c="$arr_c $a"
    fi
done

echo $arr_c
share|improve this answer
add comment

This might work for you:

arr_a=(file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt)
arr_b=(file1.txt file3.txt)
answer=$(comm -3 <(printf "%s\n" "${arr_a[@]}") <(printf "%s\n" "${arr_b[@]}")
echo "$answer"
file2.txt

Perhaps it would be wise to be a little more robust:

arr_answer=($(comm -3 <(printf "%s\n" "${arr_a[@]}") <(printf "%s\n" "${arr_b[@]}") | paste -sd' '))
((${#arr_answer[@]}==1)) && echo "$arr_answer" || echo "oops! wrong answer"
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.