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The following source code line in Ada,

type Airplane_ID is range 1..10;

, can be written as

type Airplane_ID is range 1..x;

, where x is a variable? I ask this because I want to know if the value of x can be modified, for example through text input. Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

No, the bounds of the range both have to be static expressions.

But you can declare a subtype with dynamic bounds:

X: Integer := some_value;
subtype Dynamic_Subtype is Integer range 1 .. X;
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Thank you so much. But in the example that you put, the value of X can be modified through text input, or it should be constant? –  J. C. Moreno Dec 10 '11 at 2:37
2  
The bounds in a subtype declaration can be any arbitrary expressions, as long as they're of the appropriate type. –  Keith Thompson Dec 10 '11 at 2:46
    
@Shark8's answer makes a good point. When you declare Dynamic_Subtype as above, X is evaluated when the declaration is evaluated. Modifying X later doesn't affect the subtype. –  Keith Thompson Dec 11 '11 at 0:03
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No. An Ada range declaration must be constant.

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Thank you so much. –  J. C. Moreno Dec 10 '11 at 2:25
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Can type Airplane_ID is range 1..x; be written where x is a variable? I ask this because I want to know if the value of x can be modified, for example through text input.

I assume that you mean such that altering the value of x alters the range itself in a dynamic-sort of style; if so then strictly speaking, no... but that's not quite the whole answer.

You can do something like this:

Procedure Test( X: In Positive; Sum: Out Natural ) is
  subtype Test_type is Natural Range 1..X;
  Result : Natural:= Natural'First;
 begin
   For Index in Test_type'range loop
     Result:= Result + Index;
   end loop;

   Sum:= Result;
 end Test;
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With the above you can have Test_type set to the appropriate range via the X parameter. –  Shark8 Dec 11 '11 at 0:01
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