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In Ruby, super is a keyword rather than a method.

Why was it designed this way?

Ruby's design tends toward implementing as much as possible as methods; keywords are usually reserved for language features that have their own grammar rules. super, however, looks and acts like a method call.

(I know it would be cumbersome to implement super in pure Ruby, since it would have to parse the method name out of caller, or use a trace_func. This alone wouldn't prevent it from being a method, because plenty of Kernel's methods are not implemented in pure Ruby.)

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6  
It behaves a little differently, in that if you don't pass arguments, all of the current arguments (and block, if present) are passed along... I'm not sure how that would work as a method. –  d11wtq Dec 10 '11 at 4:47
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@d11wtq gave the correct reason, maybe it should be an answer rather than a comment though? –  riffraff Dec 10 '11 at 14:16
    
@d11wtq: This is a great point, please make it an answer. It had actually occurred to me, but I wondered if that was the only reason. –  daxelrod Dec 10 '11 at 19:59
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Added my comment as an answer as requested, with an example (not for you, but for future readers) :) –  d11wtq Dec 10 '11 at 22:30
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It behaves a little differently, in that if you don't pass arguments, all of the current arguments (and block, if present) are passed along... I'm not sure how that would work as a method.

To give a rather contrived example:

class A
  def example(a, b, c)
    yield whatever(a, b) + c
  end
end

class B < A
  def example(a, b, c)
    super * 2
  end
end

I did not need to handle the yield, or pass the arguments to super. In the cases where you specifically want to pass different arguments, then it behaves more like a method call. If you want to pass no arguments at all, you must pass empty parentheses (super()).

It simply doesn't have quite the same behaviour as a method call.

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I think the most important aspect to your answer is that there is no way for a method to know whether it was called with or without parentheses. Since super is a keyword, this determination is baked into the grammar itself. I'm fairly sure, although not certain, that Ruby's internals would provide access to the arguments and block of the caller. –  daxelrod Dec 10 '11 at 23:02
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super doesn't automatically call the parent class's method. If you imagine the inheritance hierarchy of a ruby class as a list, with the class at the bottom and Object at the top, when ruby sees the the super keyword, rather than just check the the parent class, it moves up the entire list until it finds the first item that has a method defined with that name.

I'm careful to say item because it could also be a module. When you include a module in to a class, it is wrapped in an anonymous superclass and put above your class in the list I talked about before, so that means if you had a method defined for your class that was also defined in the module, then calling super from the class's implementation would call the module's implementation, and not the parent class's:

class Foo
  def f
    puts "Foo"
  end
end

module Bar
  def f
    puts "Bar"
    super
  end
end

class Foobar < Foo
  include Bar

  def f
    puts "Foobar"
    super
  end
end

foobar = Foobar.new
foobar.f
  # =>
  # Foobar
  # Bar
  # Foo

And I don't believe that it is possible to access this 'inheritance list' from the ruby environment itself, which would mean this functionality would not be available (However useful it is; I'm not every sure if this was an intended feature.)

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1  
Class#ancestors give you the "inheritance list", so this would be trivial –  riffraff Dec 10 '11 at 14:18
    
As I point out in my question, Kernel#super wouldn't have to be implemented in pure Ruby, many of the methods on Kernel are implmented in C (in MRI, at least). –  daxelrod Dec 10 '11 at 19:58
    
@riffraff Yeah, it does, but the problem arises when you use extend on an instance. So, say rather than the above case, Foobar does not include module Bar but rather I extend foobar: foobar.extend Bar. At this point, if you checked the return value of Class#ancestors, Bar would not appear in it. (That is, if you checked Foobar.ancestors or if you checked foobar.class.ancestors) –  asQuirreL Dec 22 '11 at 11:09
    
ah, true, but you can still see them if you look at the singleton class: (class <<c ;self; end).ancestors –  riffraff Dec 22 '11 at 11:14
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Hm, good qustion. I'm not sure how else (besides using super) you would you reference the super version of a given method.

You can't simply call the method by name, because the way that polymorphism works (how it figures out which version of that method to actually call, based on the object class) would cause your method to call itself, spinning into an infinite set of calls, and resulting in a stack overflow.

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Could you please clarify which method is "that method" when you say "the super version of that method"? –  daxelrod Dec 10 '11 at 4:48
    
Sorry, clarified the wording a bit. I simply meant, "The method in question - whatever method it is you're talking about." –  jefflunt Dec 10 '11 at 4:49
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you can invoke a superclass independently from the fact that a subclass has overriden it by getting an UnboundMethod object from the superclass and binding it to the subclass instance. E.g. SuperKlass.instance_method(:foo).bind(SubKlass.new).call(arguments) –  riffraff Dec 10 '11 at 14:23
    
I'm not asking why super exists, I'm asking why it's a keyword, rather than a method on, say, Kernel. If it were, you would still be able to call super in much the same way you do now. –  daxelrod Dec 10 '11 at 19:53
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