Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a file of ints that is read into a scanner. The scanner produces a LinkedList of Job that each hold 5 int values. These Job are then sorted with MergeSort and scheduled. The resultant schedule will only return one value even if there are hundreds in the file.

I have determined that both Iterable and Mergesort are working correctly. The bug is somewhere in the creation of the LinkedList.

My code up to the error region is displayed below:

public JobSchedule makeSchedule(JobSchedule.Metric metric, Job.JobOrdering ordering){
  Scanner s = new Scanner(file);
  SortableLinkedList<Job> sortable = new SortableLinkedList<Job>();
  LLNode<Job> listptr = sortable.getHead();
  //reads the contents of file into a storage array and...
  // ...inputs the stored values as parameters for Job constructors
  while(s.hasNext()){
    int[] ints = new int[5];
    for(int i = 0; i<5; i++){
       ints[i]=s.nextInt();
    }

I verified that it correctly sets the head:

    if(sortable.getHead()==null){
       sortable.setHead(new LLNode<Job>(new Job(ints[0],ints[1],
              ints[2],ints[3],ints[4]),null));
       sortable.getHead().getElement().setOrdering(ordering);
       listptr = sortable.getHead();
    }

I think this is where the program fails:

    else{
       listptr.setNext(new LLNode<Job>(new Job(ints[0],ints[1],
             ints[2],ints[3],ints[4]),null));
       listptr = listptr.getNext();
    }
  }

although in my bug testing (placed within the above else block ):

 System.out.println("Next:"+ints[0]+" "+ints[1]+" "+ints[2]+" "+ints[3]+" "+ints[4]);

It successfully printed upon every iteration.

Any thoughts?

ps. LLNode and LinkedList code:

public class LLNode<T>{  
  private T element;
  private LLNode<T> next;


  public LLNode(T element, LLNode<T> next){
    this.element = element;
    this.next = next;
  }

  public T getElement(){
    return this.element;
  }

  public LLNode<T> getNext(){
    return this.next;
  }

  public void setNext(LLNode<T> node){
    this.next=node;
  }
}



public class LinkedList<T>{
  private LLNode<T> head;

  public LinkedList(){
    head = null;
  }

  public LinkedList(LLNode<T> head){
    this.head = head;
  }

  public LLNode<T> getHead(){
    return head;
  }

  public void setHead(LLNode<T> node){
    this.head = node;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this class LLNode in the SE? I've never heard of it before and a google search doesn't suggest that it is. Also, what does the error message say? –  bdares Dec 10 '11 at 5:49
    
No its a LinkedList and LLNode created by my professor. I'll edit the question above to include their code. –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 16:51
    
And also, I guess its a bug, not an error (still fuzzy on the jargon). So no error message, just bad output from the program. –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

This piece of code:

while(s.hasNext()){
 int[] ints = new int[5];
 for(int i = 0; i<5; i++){
    ints[i]=s.nextInt();
}

creates a 5 int array and if there is more ints in the file it destroys the newly created array and creates a new one. It continues until there are no more int in the file. Best case after the while loop finishes you have only one 5 ints array. Was that your intention?

In other words your ints array stores no more than the last 5 ints from the file. You should either include some sort of addToList(ints) method in the loop or store your 5 ints arrays in an ArrayList and later retrieve them one by one when you create your Jobs and add them to the linked list.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, it's not related to your question but you shouldn't have to create a node when adding item to a linked list. Node creation and all that internal stuff should be hidden and handled inside the list. –  Mr1159pm Dec 10 '11 at 9:23
    
It is as designed for ints[] to destroy/re-create itself upon every iteration of while(s.hasNext()){. –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 16:48
    
the next iteration will create a new array from which to create the LinkedList Node LLNode<Job>. the Element of LLNode<Job> being a new Job with the current values of ints[] –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 16:50
    
Perhaps it was confusing the issue to break up my code. but the While loop doesn't end until after the end of the else{ conditional where I believe the program is bugging –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 16:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A night sleep definitely helped with this problem...

the code block:

else{
   listptr.setNext(new LLNode<Job>(new Job(ints[0],ints[1],
         ints[2],ints[3],ints[4]),null));
   listptr = listptr.getNext();
}

did not include the setOrdering(ordering) command necessary for the Jobs to be comparable by Merge Sort.

So before:

listptr = listptr.getNext();

it should read:

listptr.getNext().getElement().setOrdering(ordering);
share|improve this answer
    
All of the ints read from the Scanner were passed into Jobs, only they were in-comparable Jobs so the final output only included job placed at the head which WAS made comparable by setOrdering() –  Ocasta Eshu Dec 10 '11 at 17:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.