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I'd want you to give me a hint to prove this exercise from the book of Cormen: "Prove that no matter what node we start at in a height-h binary search tree, k successive calls to TREE-SUCCESSOR take O(k+h) time."

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  • Let x be the starting node and z be the ending node after k successive calls to TREE-SUCCESSOR.
  • Let p be the simple path between x and z inclusive.
  • Let y be the common ancestor of x and z that p visits.
  • The length of p is at most 2h, which is O(h).
  • Let output be the elements that their values are between x.key and z.key inclusive.
  • The size of output is O(k).
  • In the execution of k successive calls to TREE-SUCCESSOR, the nodes that are in p are visited, and besides the nodes x, y and z, if a sub tree of a node in p is visited then all its elements are in output.
  • So the running time is O(h+k).
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In the execution of k successive calls to TREE-SUCCESSOR, the nodes that are in p are visited, and besides the nodes x, y and z Can you please explain what is y here? –  Rafi Kamal Dec 11 '12 at 13:24
    
I added y to the answer. –  Avi Cohen Dec 11 '12 at 15:41

Hint: work out a small example, observe the result, try to extrapolate the reason.

To get started, here are some things to consider.

Start at a certain node, k succesive calls to Tree-Succcesor consititutes a partial tree walk. How many (at least and at most) nodes does this walk visit? (Hint: Think about key(x)). Keep in mind that an edge is visited at most twice (why?).

Final hint: The result is O(2h+k).

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A node is visited at most trice. –  Avi Cohen Sep 8 '12 at 11:58

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