Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the diffrence beatween say:

Vector<int*> myVector[5] and Vector<int> *myVector[5]

The way I see it, in the first case, my vector will contain 5 counts of pointers to ints. In the second case, myVector is a pointer to an array of 5 ints.

The reason I ask is because I wrote some code a while back and now I don't understand it any more.

With Vector<int> *myVector[5], why can I do

for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            myVector[i] = new Integer(13);
        }

I know for a fact that the operator new returns a pointer, and then I'm storing it in myVector, but a pointer to an int is not an int right? I'm confused.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
Vector<int*> myVector[5]

Creates an array of size 5 to Vector<int*>.

 Vector<int> *myVector[5]

Creates an array of 5 pointers to Vector<int>.
Instead, Using vector to vector is a cleaner soution:

vector<vector<int> > myVector(5);
share|improve this answer
    
OH, int he second case I have an array of pointers to Vectors that contain ints....I get it now!! Thanks. So in the first case, I'm creating an array that will contain vectors that contain pointers to ints. I got confused with vectors...did not realize I was using Arrays. So to create a vector containing ints, I suppose I would go vector<int> myVector(5) –  viau_a Dec 11 '11 at 22:20

When using Vector *myVector[5], myVector is not a pointer to an array of 5 ints, but an array of 5 pointers which point to vector.

Vector<int> *myVector[5];
for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    myVector[i] = new Integer(13);
}

Here, myVector[i] is an pointer of vector. I don't think this piece of code can compliles. Would you give some detail about class Integer?

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I had modified my code....to make it simpler and now realize that you are right, this makes no sense at all. Thanks for the help. –  viau_a Dec 11 '11 at 22:27
std::vector<int*> myVector[5]; // array of vector of pointer to int
std::vector<int> *myVector2[5]; // array of pointer to vector of int
for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    myVector[i]=*new std::vector<int *>(2);
int j=42;
myVector[0].push_back(&j);
for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    myVector2[i]=new std::vector<int>(2);
myVector2[0]->push_back(j);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I understand now. Makes sense! –  viau_a Dec 11 '11 at 22:30

The way I see it, in the first case, my vector will contain 5 counts of pointers to ints. In the second case, myVector is a pointer to an array of 5 ints.

No. In the first case, you will have 5 Vector<int*> objects, and in the second case you will have 5 Vector<int> objects. A Vector<int*> is (probably) a vector of pointers to integers. A Vector<int> is (probably) a vector of integers. So what you will essentially have is a 2-dimensional array, though one dimension would be a dynamic array (vector).

I know for a fact that the operator new returns a pointer, and then I'm storing it in myVector, but a pointer to an int is not an int right? I'm confused.

A pointer to an int is not an int, but it can be stored as an int, at least on 32-bit Windows.

But in your case, that's not what's happening. A pointer to an Integer is being stored as a pointer to a Vector<int>. Perhaps on some older versions of Visual C++ the code would compile as it allowed implicit conversions between different pointer types. On newer versions it shouldn't compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Thinks makes sense now, Thanks!! –  viau_a Dec 11 '11 at 22:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.