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Here is a classic example of a class with two getters for its fields:

class point
{
    int x_, y_;

public:

    point(int x, int y) : x_(x), y_(y) {}

    int x() const
    {
        return x_;
    }

    int y() const
    {
        return y_;
    }
};

int main()
{
    point p(1, 2);
    std::cout << p.x() << ", " << p.y() << '\n';
}

One could argue that printing a point to an output stream should really be provided by an overload of operator<<, but let's suppose that a client wants to print in his own favorite format or do something completely different with x and y. Then he clearly needs to get to the x and y fields somehow, right?

A basic principle of object-oriented programming is "tell, don't ask". That is, ideally I should tell my object to do something with the x and y fields instead of asking for them. That led me to the following idea:

class point
{
    int x_, y_;

public:

    point(int x, int y) : x_(x), y_(y) {}

    template<typename Fun>
    void operator()(Fun fun) const
    {
        fun(x_, y_);
    }
};

int main()
{
    point p(3, 4);
    p([](int x, int y){
        std::cout << x << ", " << y << '\n';
    });
}

This would have been too clumsy in C++98, but now that we have lambdas, it seems feasible to me. Is this approach actually more sound than the first version with the getters, or am I a bit too enthusiastic?

What do you think? How widely applicable is it? Is there something I'm missing? Could it be improved?

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3  
I don't quite see what it wins, sure it's a cool use of lambdas, but it doesn't seem to win much at all. –  Flexo Dec 10 '11 at 9:18
    
@Charles: Because fields should rarely be allowed to be changed from outside the class. Remember, the point class is just an example. –  FredOverflow Dec 10 '11 at 9:27
1  
What exactly have you gained here? The code still depends on those variables being available and having the expected meaning. –  Mankarse Dec 10 '11 at 9:29
    
@Mankarse: No, I could choose a different set of fields anytime. All I would have to change then is the fun(x_, y_); line, and clients would still work. –  FredOverflow Dec 10 '11 at 9:36
3  
@FredOverflow: So... say you want to change it to be a 3D point instead of a 2D point. To do this you would have to add a z_ variable. Suddenly every lambda which performs printing would have to be updated to include this extra point. The abstraction that you are providing of "call an arbitrary function with my fields" is not a particularly useful one. A better way might be to present some sort of tuple interface to "Fields that should be printed", and then to have printers/formatters work off that abstraction. –  Mankarse Dec 10 '11 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
p([](int x, int y){
    std::cout << x << ", " << y << '\n';
});

IMO, having to write the lambda around some code instead of just writing the code is still boiler-plate.

The only difference between having individual accessors and this is that the class can assume that the values are always accessed together. This just might provide new ways of producing those values that wouldn't be possible if they each had to be produced individually (e.g perhaps it is a lot cheaper to request 2 values at a time, rather than to make 2 requests for one value).

The latter is hardly the case for many classes (such as Point), where there's no real gain for the expense of more complicate usage.

share|improve this answer

This would have been too clumsy in C++98

Actually, it is quite easy (at least in c++03):

class point
{
    int x_, y_;

public:

    point(int x, int y) : x_(x), y_(y) {}

    template<typename Fun>
    void operator()(Fun fun) const
    {
        fun(x_, y_);
    }
};

void foo(int,int)
{
}

int main()
{
    point p(3, 4);
    p(&foo);
}

Could it be improved?

Yes : remove getters and put x and y in the public section :

struct point
{
  int x;
  int y
};
share|improve this answer
    
Fields should rarely be allowed to be changed from outside the class. The point class is just an example. –  FredOverflow Dec 10 '11 at 9:34
4  
Actually, VJovic is right in this case. The answer of class vs struct depends on how you intend to use the members. If you intend to totally encapsulate point so that no one knows its internal structure, then you use a class. If you intend to only use it like a data structures with just getters and setters, you should use a struct instead. –  kfmfe04 Dec 10 '11 at 9:54
4  
You make the claim that your C++03 functor is easy -- but that's not what matters, the OP's claim was that it's clumsy, not that it's hard. Given that your 'solution' is defined out of line and it's not outright clear e.g. what kind of linkage it uses, I fail to see how it's not clumsier than the C++11 lambda (defined inline, with no linkage). Without even mentioning the boilerplate-to-code ratio. In addition I think making the members public here is a bit off topic. –  Luc Danton Dec 10 '11 at 10:23
    
This answer would be fine only if the answer to the question "why do we need getters/setters?" was "oh, we just don't need them." But that question can be answered differently, and not discussing it at all doesn't seem right. –  7vies Dec 10 '11 at 15:59

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