Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

http://jsbin.com/ufihev/3/edit

Pretty simple code :

var t = new function () //line 1
    {
        this.a1 = function () {

            return function () {
                alert("1");
            };
        }();
        this.a2 = function () {
            alert("a2");
        };

    }; //line 16
t.a1();

But jsBin red line bellow tells me :

Line 1: var t = new function () --- Weird construction. Delete 'new'.

Line 16: }; --- Missing '()' invoking a constructor.

the code is working fine.

What am I doing wrong ?

share|improve this question
    
Working fine in my Firefox/Chrome. Which browser are you running trouble into? –  Abdul Munim Dec 10 '11 at 9:34
    
@Munim jsBin red line bellow .....Ive edited. look at the link . thanks. –  Royi Namir Dec 10 '11 at 9:35
    
@Munim it's working with two warnings. –  Rupesh Pawar Dec 10 '11 at 9:36
    
See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2274695/… –  Hristo Dec 10 '11 at 9:42
    
@Hristo How the hell did you find this ??? :) thanks I will look at that. –  Royi Namir Dec 10 '11 at 9:42
show 4 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think @regality answers is best.

And if you want to know the reason then it is weird because the purpose of defining a constructor is to be able to reuse it to create many objects.

share|improve this answer
    
His code is the best but your explanation cleared the things for me.... the re-use mechanism is now make sense. –  Royi Namir Dec 10 '11 at 9:48
add comment

If you're going to write an "anonymous type" equivalent to:

var _anonymous_type = function () {
    ...
}

var t = new _anonymous_type();

You should:

var t = new (function () {
    ...
})();

See the difference from you code? :)

share|improve this answer
    
The second is just an inlining of the first ... why would that be considered wrong? –  ripper234 Mar 19 '12 at 14:11
add comment

Try this:

var t = function () //line 1
    {
        this.a1 = function () {

            return function () {
                alert("1");
            };
        }();
        this.a2 = function () {
            alert("a2");
        };

    }; //line 16

var x = new t();
x.a1();
share|improve this answer
    
I can do that ALSO.... But my Code is syntactical fine. I can't see any reason why it wont work.... –  Royi Namir Dec 10 '11 at 9:39
1  
There is nothing wrong with var t = new function ()... –  Royi Namir Dec 10 '11 at 9:39
    
Technically there is nothing wrong with var t = new function()..., but there isn't a good reason to do that. Hence the weird constructor. –  regality Dec 10 '11 at 9:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.