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I am using c# 3.5.

Can you please explain following.

  1. What are interfaces ? Why do we use interfaces? Where we can use interfaces in real life projects?
  2. What is abstract class? Why do we use abstract classes, and where we can use abstract classes in real life projects?
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closed as not a real question by Tudor, Mitch Wheat, Mat, CodesInChaos, Rune FS Dec 10 '11 at 10:45

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Waaay too broad mate. –  Tudor Dec 10 '11 at 10:42
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search the internet. Helll, search SO even. –  Mitch Wheat Dec 10 '11 at 10:43
    
Here is a basic primer: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3b5b8ezk%28v=vs.80%29.aspx –  Ahmed Masud Dec 10 '11 at 10:47
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, you question is very broad, but I will try to give two quick examples:

Abstract classes are useful if you need to implement several related classes that share some part of their functionality. In this case it is a good idea to implement the common functionality inside an abstract class and derive all the other classes from this one. A class cannot inherit more than one abstract class.

Interface are useful if you need a certain class to respect a certain contract, that is to have certain methods. A class can inherit any number of interfaces.

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*Your, sorry for the typo. –  Tudor Dec 10 '11 at 10:53
    
You can edit your answer, you know. –  Otiel Dec 10 '11 at 12:17
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