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What would be an efficient way of replacing a fixed position substring with another string of equal or larger length?

For example, the following replaces the substring "abc" by finding the position of "abc" first and then replacing it:

sub("abc", "123", "iabc.def", fixed = TRUE)
#[1] "i123.def"

sub("abc", "1234", "iabc.def", fixed = TRUE)
#[1] "i1234.def"

However, we know that the substring "abc" is ALWAYS in character positions 2, 3 and 4. In this case, is there a way of specifying those positions so that the string matching doesn't need to be performed and the character indices used instead?

I did try to use substr() but it didn't work as I had hoped when the replacement string is larger than the substring being replaced:

x <- "iabc.def"
substr(x, 2, 4) <- "123"
#[1] "i123.def"

x <- "iabc.def"
substr(x, 2, 4) <- "1234"
#[1] "i123.def"

Many thanks in advance for your time,

Tony Breyal

P.S. The above may be the most efficient way of doing what I want but I thought I would ask just in case there is a better way :)

===== TIMINGS =====

#                             test elapsed  relative
# 7 francois.fx_wb(x, replacement)    0.94  1.000000
# 1                           f(x)    1.56  1.659574
# 6    francois.fx(x, replacement)    2.23  2.372340
# 5                      Sobala(x)    3.89  4.138298
# 2                    Hong.Ooi(x)    4.41  4.691489
# 3                        DWin(x)    5.57  5.925532
# 4                      hadley(x)    9.47 10.074468

The above timings were generated from the code below:

library(rbenchmark)
library(stringr)
library(Rcpp)
library(inline)

f <- function(x, replacement = "1234")  sub("abc", replacement, x, fixed = TRUE)

Hong.Ooi <- function(x, replacement = "1234") paste(substr(x, 1, 1), replacement, substr(x, 5, nchar(x)), sep = "")

DWin <- function(x, replacement =  paste("\\1", "1234", sep = "")) sub("^(.)abc", replacement, x)

Sobala <- function(x, replacement =  paste("\\1", "1234", sep = ""))  sub("^(.).{3}", replacement, x, perl=TRUE)

hadley <- function(x, replacement = "1234") {
  str_sub(x, 2, 4) <- replacement
  return(x)
}

francois.fx <- cxxfunction( signature( x_ = "character", rep_ = "character" ), '

    const char* rep =as<const char*>(rep_) ;
    CharacterVector x(x_) ;
    int nrep = strlen( rep ) ;
    int n = x.size() ; 
    CharacterVector res(n) ;

    char buffer[1024] ;

    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        const char* xi = x[i] ;
        if( strncmp( xi+1, "abc", 3 ) ) {
            res[i] = x[i] ;
        } else{
            buffer[0] = xi[0] ;
            strncpy( buffer + 1, rep, nrep ) ;
            strcpy( buffer + 1 + nrep, xi + 4 ) ;
            res[i] = buffer ;
        }
    }
    return res ;
', plugin = "Rcpp" )

francois.fx_wb <- cxxfunction( signature( x_ = "character", rep_ = "character" ), '

    const char* rep =as<const char*>(rep_) ;
    int nrep = strlen( rep ) ;
    int n=Rf_length(x_) ;
    SEXP res = PROTECT( Rf_allocVector( STRSXP, n ) ) ;

    char buffer[1024] ;

    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        const char* xi = char_get_string_elt(x_, i) ;
        if( strncmp( xi+1, "abc", 3 ) ) {
            set_string_elt( res, i, get_string_elt(x_,i)) ;
        } else{
            buffer[0] = xi[0] ;
            strncpy( buffer + 1, rep, nrep ) ;
            strcpy( buffer + 1 + nrep, xi + 4 ) ;
            char_set_string_elt(res, i, buffer ) ;
        }
    }
    UNPROTECT(1) ;
    return res ;
', plugin = "Rcpp" )


x <- rep("iabc.def", 1e6)
replacement <- "1234"
benchmark(f(x), Hong.Ooi(x), DWin(x), hadley(x), Sobala(x), francois.fx(x, replacement), francois.fx_wb(x, replacement),
          columns = c("test", "elapsed", "relative"),
          order = "relative",
          replications = 10)
share|improve this question
    
Your winning strategy at the moment will not allow you to offer a variable length vector to the "replacement" argument, either. I think you need to construct a more complete test case that illustrates all the aspects you want to accomplish. –  BondedDust Dec 10 '11 at 15:21
    
@DWin The post above is almost perfectly the exact case I am interested in as I'm trying to beat the 16th solution on this page (just for fun but I think it is interesting too): rwiki.sciviews.org/… I'm pretty sure there has to be a better way when the character indices one wants to replace are known than having to do a string match first. –  Tony Breyal Dec 10 '11 at 16:17
    
str_sub in stringr works the way you'd expect so you can do this sort of replacement easily. –  hadley Dec 10 '11 at 22:46
    
@hadley I guess stringr is one of those cases where it may not be as fast as the others but, on the other hand, for smaller projects, it is far more easier to understand and use (btw, great package, makes coding in R much easier I find). –  Tony Breyal Dec 10 '11 at 23:14
3  
Personally I find my data analyses are limited by thinking time not computing time. I seem to be in the minority –  hadley Dec 10 '11 at 23:43
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is one solution based on Rcpp.

fx <- cxxfunction( signature( x_ = "character", rep_ = "character" ), '

    const char* rep =as<const char*>(rep_) ;
    CharacterVector x(x_) ;
    int nrep = strlen( rep ) ;
    int n = x.size() ; 
    CharacterVector res(n) ;

    char buffer[1024] ;

    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        const char* xi = x[i] ;
        if( strncmp( xi+1, "abc", 3 ) ) {
            res[i] = x[i] ;
        } else{
            buffer[0] = xi[0] ;
            strncpy( buffer + 1, rep, nrep ) ;
            strcpy( buffer + 1 + nrep, xi + 4 ) ;
            res[i] = buffer ;
        }
    }
    return res ;
', plugin = "Rcpp" )

it does not improve much on the simple sub solution because write access to strings in R are protected by the write barrier. I get better results if I cheat on the write barrier, but I'm not fully aware of the consequences, so I should probably advise against it :/

fx_wb <- cxxfunction( signature( x_ = "character", rep_ = "character" ), '

    const char* rep =as<const char*>(rep_) ;
    int nrep = strlen( rep ) ;
    int n=Rf_length(x_) ;
    SEXP res = PROTECT( Rf_allocVector( STRSXP, n ) ) ;

    char buffer[1024] ;

    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        const char* xi = char_get_string_elt(x_, i) ;
        if( strncmp( xi+1, "abc", 3 ) ) {
            set_string_elt( res, i, get_string_elt(x_,i)) ;
        } else{
            buffer[0] = xi[0] ;
            strncpy( buffer + 1, rep, nrep ) ;
            strcpy( buffer + 1 + nrep, xi + 4 ) ;
            char_set_string_elt(res, i, buffer ) ;
        }
    }
    UNPROTECT(1) ;
    return res ;
', plugin = "Rcpp" )

Write barrier

The R Internals manual describes the write barrier:

A generational collector needs to efficiently ‘age’ the objects, especially list-like objects (including STRSXPs). This is done by ensuring that the elements of a list are regarded as at least as old as the list when they are assigned. This is handled by the functions SET_VECTOR_ELT and SET_STRING_ELT, which is why they are functions and not macros. Ensuring the integrity of such operations is termed the write barrier and is done by making the SEXP opaque and only providing access via functions (which cannot be used as lvalues in assignments in C).

All code in R extensions is by default behind the write barrier.

And Luke Tierney's document describes the logic behind why:

The generational collector divides allocated nodes into generations based on some notion of age. Younger generations are collected more frequently than older ones. For this to work correctly, any younger nodes that are reachable only from older nodes must be handled properly. This is accomplished by a write barrier that monitors each assignment and takes appropriate action when a reference to a new node is placed in an older one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, Romain, very interesting! I'm going to have to google this write barrier thing :) –  Tony Breyal Dec 14 '11 at 11:05
    
check the "R internals" manual. –  Romain Francois Dec 14 '11 at 12:05
    
yes, the write barrier trick is definitively to avoid. don't do this at home –  Romain Francois Dec 16 '11 at 14:35
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You can still use regex with a placeholder like this:

> sub("^(.)abc", "\\1xyz", c("aabcdef", "xxxxxxx"))
[1] "axyzdef" "xxxxxxx"
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I didn't know you could do that with a regex - always good to learn something new! Doesn't improve the timing (see post) but thanks :) –  Tony Breyal Dec 10 '11 at 14:55
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Most straightforward way I can think of:

x <- paste(substr(x, 1, 1), "1234", substr(x, 5, nchar(x)), sep="")
share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea of breaking up the string into its various components. I benchmarked it (see Timings in my post) but looks like paste() slows things down. Thank you kindly for the suggestion however :) –  Tony Breyal Dec 10 '11 at 11:49
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Some improvement of DWin function.

function(x, replacement =  paste("\\1", "1234", sep = "")) 
                     sub("^(.).{3}", replacement, x,perl=TRUE)
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, the perl = TRUE parameter, always wondered about that... –  Tony Breyal Dec 10 '11 at 23:55
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