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I have looked at the php documentation, tutorials online and none of them how usort is actually working. I have an example i was playing with below.

$data = array(

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 11,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 5,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 8,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 12,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 2,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 3,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 4,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 7,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 10,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 1,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 6,'level' => 10),

    array('msg' => 'some text','month' => 9,'level' => 10)

);

I wanted to be able to sort the months from 12 to 1 (since their unorganized) through some help this was the solution

function cmp($a, $b)
{
    if ($a["month"] == $b["month"]) 
    {
       return 0;
    }
    return ($a["month"] < $b["month"]) ? -1 : 1;
}

usort($data, "cmp");

but i dont understand how the function cmp sorts the array. i tried printing out each variable $a and $b like this:

function cmp($a, $b)
{
   echo "a: ".$a['month']."<br/>;
   echo " b: ".$b['month']."<br/>;
   echo "<br/><br/>";
}

and the output was

a: 3
b: 5

a: 9
b: 3

a: 3
b: 8

a: 6
b: 3

a: 3
b: 12

a: 1
b: 3

a: 3
b: 2

a: 10
b: 3

a: 3
b: 11

a: 7
b: 3

a: 4
b: 3

a: 12
b: 2

a: 5
b: 12

a: 12
b: 11

a: 8
b: 12

a: 5
b: 8

a: 2
b: 11

a: 6
b: 9

a: 7
b: 6

a: 6
b: 4

a: 10
b: 6

a: 1
b: 6

a: 9
b: 4

a: 7
b: 1

a: 10
b: 7

it makes no sense to how the sort is working and why cmp($a, $b) is used. i have tried to print out all its processes as you can see but have not come to any solution to how it all works..

thanks

share|improve this question
    
your latter function doesn't return anything. –  Your Common Sense Dec 10 '11 at 11:04
    
Are you wanting to know how it all meshes together, or the algorithm usort uses behind the scenes? –  Corbin Dec 10 '11 at 11:05
    
@corbin, yes if its public info. –  Sarmen B. Dec 10 '11 at 11:09
    
@col you need to include the arrays into the test your doing. –  Sarmen B. Dec 10 '11 at 11:09
    
Of course it's public information. You can download the PHP source code after all :). I'm feeling to lazy at the moment to check myself, but I'll trust PaulPRO that it uses a quicksort implementation. For more details than that, read the PHP source code. –  Corbin Dec 10 '11 at 11:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The function cmp itself doesn't do the sorting. It just tells usort if a value is smaller, equal or greater than another value. E.g. if $a = 5 and $b = 9 it will return 1 to indicate that the value in $b is greater than the one in $a.

Sorting is done by usort.

share|improve this answer
    
wow what you said made alot of sense. I should've seen that. do i always have to enter two arguments into the cmp function? –  Sarmen B. Dec 10 '11 at 11:08
1  
Yep, the compare function always takes two arguments. –  halfdan Dec 10 '11 at 11:12

The callback provided to the sorting functions in PHP have three return values:

0:  both elements are the same
-1 (<0): the first element is smaller than the second
1 (>0):  the first element is greater

Now, usort probably uses some kind of quicksort or mergesort internally. For each comparison it calls your callback with two elements and then decides if it needs to swap them or not.

share|improve this answer

usort() uses an implementation of Quicksort to sort the array, it calls your cmp function as many times as it needs to to fully sort the array using that algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
Usort uses counting sort and not quick sort.Check this ijest.info/docs/IJEST11-03-09-057.pdf. –  user1613360 Jul 26 '14 at 18:51
    
@user1613360 You've mistaken PHP's usort, for the usort algorithm mentioned in that paper. PHP's usort is implemented with Quicksort. –  Paulpro Jul 28 '14 at 15:49

As the others mentioned, usort uses the Quicksort algorithm. On a side note, you do not need to explicitly do the comparision between two strings. You can use PHP's string compare methods.

The function that you created,

function cmp($a, $b)
{
    if ($a["month"] == $b["month"]) 
    {
       return 0;
    }
    return ($a["month"] < $b["month"]) ? -1 : 1;
}

could simply be written as follows

function compareMyStrings($a, $b){
    return strnatcmp($a["month"], $b["month"]);
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

This is another solution I found

<?php 
$users = array( array( "peter", "male", "46"), 
                array( "hans", "male", "19"), 
                array( "john", "male", "30"), 
                array( "linda", "female", "54"), 
                array( "erika", "female", "79")); 
usort($users, "whatevername"); 
function whatevername($whatever1, $whatever2) 
{ 
    // $whatever1 and $whatever2 are items from the $user array. 
    // index [2] is the age. 
    // Check if $whatever1 is older than $whatever2. 
    // Return 1 tells usort to swap the positions. 
    return $whatever1[2] > $whatever2[2]; 
} 

echo("<pre>"); 
print_r($users); 
echo("</pre>"); 
?>
share|improve this answer

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