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I have a table 10 rows, 10 colums. I want to define an array where I can place a value at e.g. pos. row 5, column 3.

The value itself is an array with more entries. And the entry of this array is also an array.

Example:

Row 1, column 1:
   My text 1, Link to text 1
   My text 2, Link to text 2

Row 4, column 5:
   My text 3, Link to text 3

Row 6, column 2:
   My text 1, Link to text 1
   My text 2, Link to text 2
   My text 3, Link to text 3
   My text 4, Link to text 4

Not every table entry needs to be defined. A table element entry can have multiple entries. An entry consists of two values. A text and the link for the text.

The html-table is already defined. Now I want to fill it with the values (links) above.

My problem is, how to create an efficient data structure so that I easily can find table-positions that have entries (maybe without looping 10 rows 10 columns). For each entry I want to get the list of texts + links.

And how to access/read each entry of my definition. (I have no problem placing the value to my html-table.)

I'd really apreciate if someone could give me some code-example how to set up such a data structure.

Tnx in advance, Enkidu

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4 Answers 4

var multiArray = [ ['element 0, 0', 'element 0, 1', 'element 0, 2'], ['element 1, 0', 'element 1, 1']];

and so on...

EDIT every single notation in [] is an array, so you just have to combine them into an another array

share|improve this answer
    
it's not important to have the same length for all columns in JS, I like it –  haynar Dec 10 '11 at 11:47
    
Am I right that using this notation, I have to define EVERY table row+column, even if I do not need a certain field? –  Enkidu Dec 10 '11 at 12:19
    
Yep. That is true. –  FK82 Dec 10 '11 at 16:00
    
@Enkidu what do you mean by "even if I do not need a certain field" ? –  haynar Dec 10 '11 at 16:06
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Just use an array of array if the memory is not the problem;

var table = [];
table.length = 10; // 10 rows;

for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    table[i] = [];
    table[i].length = 20; // 20 columns for each row.
}

If the table is big but only a few cells are used, you can also use a hash of hash:

var table = {};
table.rowCount = 10; // there're 10 rows

table[1] = {}
table[1].columnCount = 20 // 20 cells for row 1
table[1][3] = "hello world";

// visit all cells
for (var row in table) {
    for (var column in table[row] {
        console.log(table[row][column]);
    }
}

You can even mix hash and array.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second example is what I was already experimenting with. I have no problem attaching a simple string e.g. "table[1][3] = "hello world";". But I have my problems attaching an array. I tried with table[1][3] = new Array( new Array( 'text1', 'link1'), new Array( 'text2', 'link2' ) ); but I do not know how to access the values... Btw, instead of "new Array()", can I also write [ a, b ]? –  Enkidu Dec 10 '11 at 12:11
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You could create a simple wrapper to make calling convenient: http://jsfiddle.net/QRRXG/2/.

A multidimensional array is just an array in another. So you can build an array with 10 arrays which in turn have 10 arrays in each. Then get one with arr[i][j].

Items can be represented as an object:

{ name: "foo", link: "bar" }

then such an item can be parsed like obj.name and obj.link.

var multi = (function() {
    var data = [];

    // initialize
    for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        data[i] = [];
        for(var j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
            data[i][j] = [];
        }
    }

    return {
        get: function(i, j) { // will return an array of items
            return data[i][j];
        },

        push: function(i, j, v) { // will add an item
            data[i][j].push(v);
        },

        clear: function(i, j) { // will remove all items
            data[i][j] = [];
        },

        iterateDefined: function(f) {
            for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                for(var j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
                    if(data[i][j].length > 0) {
                        f(data[i][j], i, j);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    };
})();

You can the use it like:

multi.push(2, 3, { name: "foo", link: "test1" });
multi.push(2, 3, { name: "bar", link: "test2" });

multi.push(1, 4, { name: "haz", link: "test3" });

multi.push(5, 7, { name: "baz", link: "test4" });
multi.clear(5, 7);


console.log(multi.get(2, 3)); // logs an array of 2 items
console.log(multi.get(1, 4)); // logs an array of 1 item
console.log(multi.get(5, 7)); // logs an array of 0 items

console.log(multi.get(2, 3)[0].name); // logs "foo"
console.log(multi.get(2, 3)[1].link); // logs "test2"


multi.iterateDefined(function(items, i, j) {
    console.log(items, i, j); // will log two times
});
share|improve this answer
    
This looks really smart! :) But my problem is that I do not want to access a certain field in the table but to just get the values of the fields defined. (There are maybe only 20 of 100 with values.) –  Enkidu Dec 10 '11 at 12:18
    
@user1021944: The update iterates over non-empty fields. –  pimvdb Dec 10 '11 at 12:27
    
Great! Tnx! Seems to be what I want! :) –  Enkidu Dec 10 '11 at 12:34
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Create a utility Object:

var DataTable = {
    source: [],
    setEntry: function(i,j,e) {
      var o ;
        if( !!! ( o = this.source[i] )  ) o = this.source[i] = [] ;
        o[j] = e ;
        return this ;
    },
    getEntry: function(i,j) {
      var o, e = null ;
        if( !! ( o = this.source[i] ) ) e = o[j] || null ;
      return e ;
    }
} ;

The other answers seem to suggest placing dummy Arrays as placeholders for coordinates that are unused. This -- while it is not wrong -- is unnecessary: if you set an entry on an Array in JavaScript whose index exceeds the current range the Array is essentially padded with undefined values.

var a = [ ] ; // a length is 0
    a[1024] = 1 // a length is now 1025, a[1] is undefined

Then add the values you require:

DataTable.setEntry( 1, 1, ["My text 1","Link to text 1","My text 2","Link to text 2"] )
.setEntry( 4, 5, ["My text 3","Link to text 3"] ) 
//..
;

The following control statements will return the value of the Arrays of the coordinates or null (if DataTable.source does not contain a nested Array for the given coordinates):

console.log("(!!) d.source: " + DataTable.getEntry(4,5) ) ;
console.log("(!!) d.source: " + DataTable.getEntry(1,1) ) ;
console.log("(!!) d.source: " + DataTable.getEntry(0,0) ) ;

Try it here:

HTH,

FK

share|improve this answer
    
Tnx. I never used this kind of coding before. But it seems it is exactly what I am searching for. –  Enkidu Dec 10 '11 at 18:58
    
Welcome! Let me know if I need to elaborate any code part. –  FK82 Dec 10 '11 at 20:20
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