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I have a lot of classes UNO,HAV,MAS,KOS I want to create a factory pattern.

 validator.load("UNO").validate();

I need dynamically load classes into validator class and return an instance.
(dynamically set name of the class and return an instance)
My problem is: how can I return the instance of a class, if I have incompatible types?

I don't know what to write in return type of method.

The main problem in the Validator CLASS.

public SegmentAbstract load(String str) {

AND

return SegmentAbsClass.forName(identify);

Main class

try{
   validator.load("UNO").validate();
}catch(Exception e){
   System.out.print("No class ");
}

Abstract Class (SegmentAbstract)

public abstract class SegmentAbstract {

  public abstract Boolean validate();
}

Class UNO

public class UNA extends SegmentAbstract{

  public Boolean validate() {
    System.out.print("UNO!!");
    return true;
  }

}

Class Validator

public class Validator {

  public SegmentAbstract load(String str) {
    String identify = str.substring(0, 3);
    try {

      return SegmentAbsClass.forName(identify);
    }
    catch(Exception e) {
      return this;
    }

  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you have to return always a new copy of the SegmentAbstract classes? –  hellectronic Dec 10 '11 at 13:00
1  
@Dezigo as long as your classes extend SegementAbstract they are not incompatible since all of them implement validate(). What exactly is the issue? –  stacker Dec 10 '11 at 13:02
    
yes! always a new copy! –  Dezigo Dec 10 '11 at 13:03
    
@stacker I know an another way, using switch case.. but i don`t want use it –  Dezigo Dec 10 '11 at 13:06
1  
But what is exactly the problem? The code seems to be ok. (Except that catch(Exception e) { return this; } looks suspicious for me.) Or maybe you have forgot newInstance? –  Vlad Dec 10 '11 at 13:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I will do something like that:

// ISegment.java
public interface ISegment {
    Boolean validate();
}

// Uno.java
public class Uno implements ISegment {
    public Boolean validate() {
        System.out.print("UNO!!");
        return true;
    }
}

// SegmentFactory.java
public final class SegmentFactory {
    public static enum Supported {
        UNO("uno", Uno.class), /* ... */, HAV("hav", Hav.class);

        private final Class<?> clazz;
        private final String name;

        private Supported(final String name, final Class<?> clazz) {
            this.name = name;
            this.clazz = clazz;
        }

        public Class<?> getClazz() {
            return clazz;
        }

        public static Supported for(final String name) {
            for (final Supported s : values()) {
                if (s.name.equals(name) {
                    return s;
                }
            }
            return null; // a default one
        }
    }

    public static ISegment create(final Supported supp) {
        if (supp == null) {
            return null;
        }
        return supp.getClazz.newInstance();
    }

    private SegmentFactory() {
        // avoid instantiation
    }
}

usage:

final ISegment sa = SegmentFactory.create(SegmentFactory.Supported.for("uno"));
sa.validate();

Not tested!!

share|improve this answer

Try this :

public interface Validator {
    boolean validate(Object obj);
}

public final class ValidatorFactory {
    private ValidatorFactory(){}

    public static Validator load(String type){
        try {
            Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(type);
            if (Arrays.asList(clazz.getInterfaces()).contains(Validator.class)){
                return (Validator) clazz.newInstance();
            }
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Provided class doesn't implement Validator interface");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Wrong class provided", e);
        } 
    }
}

Maybe this will help???

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but I have chosen another way.:) –  Dezigo Dec 10 '11 at 13:49

Take a look here. Briefly, the idea is to create a map in your factory class (Map<String,String>, key is identifier, value is fully qualified class name), and add supported classes during initialization. Then you use reflection to instantiate an object in your factory method. Also, you can avoid reflection by using Map<String, SegmentAbstract> instead of Map<String,String> and adding public abstract getNewSegment() to your SegmentAbstract class.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's better to use a Map<String, Class<?>> for refactoring. –  RC. Dec 10 '11 at 13:16
    
@RC: I agree, it's just an example that hopefully pushes the OP to the right direction. –  a1ex07 Dec 10 '11 at 13:24

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