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I am trying to understand the state of a Thread object after the thread has completed. I read in a book that once a thread has completed its run() method, the thread object will still be a valid object on the head and can still be used as an instance object and you can still call methods on it. I decided to try this with the following example:

class DieThread implements Runnable{

    int y = 0;

    public void run(){
        for(int x=0; x<100; x++){
            System.out.println("             " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            System.out.println("y is " + y);
            y++;
            System.out.println("y is " + y);
        }
    }   
}

class ZiggyTest2{
    public static void main(String[] args){     

        DieThread d = new DieThread();

        Thread a = new Thread(d);
        Thread b = new Thread(d);
        Thread c = new Thread(d);

        a.start();
        b.start();
        c.start();

        try{
            a.join();
            b.join();
            c.join();
        }catch(Exception e){
            System.out.println(e);
        }

        System.out.println("Running C's Run");
        c.run();        
    }
}

main() waits for the other 3 threads to complete by using join(). It then call c's run() method but for some reason it is not printing out anything from the run() method. Here is the last few lines of the output after i run the above program.

y is 287
y is 287
y is 288
y is 289
             Thread-1
             Thread-0
y is 289
y is 289
y is 290
y is 291
             Thread-1
             Thread-0
y is 291
y is 291
y is 292
y is 293
             Thread-1
             Thread-0
y is 293
y is 293
y is 294
y is 295
             Thread-0
y is 295
y is 296
             Thread-0
y is 296
y is 297
             Thread-0
y is 297
y is 298
             Thread-0
y is 298
y is 299
             Thread-0
y is 299
y is 300
Running C's Run

Even though the thread has completed, i was expecting the value of y to be 400 because of the c.run() call.

Any ideas?

Thanks

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1  
Are you sure you didn't want to call d.run()? Also, I'm surprised nothing broke as you had 3 threads incrementing the same variable with no locks in place. –  Thomas Dec 10 '11 at 13:34
    
Yes i wanted to run the thread object after it has completed. –  ziggy Dec 10 '11 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason for what you are observing is buried in the implementation of the Thread class.

When you call c.run() you are calling the run method on the thread object. This is specified as calling the run method of the target object (i.e. the runnable supplied in the Thread constructor) if it is not null. If target is null then the Thread.run() method does nothing.

OK, so you supplied a non-null target.

In fact, when a Thread finishes, the Thread.exit() method is called to clean up. And one of the things that the cleanup does is to assign null to target. (The code has a comment about needing to aggressively clear references, and a bug id. Unfortunately, the corresponding bug report is missing, so it is not possible to know the real reason(s) that they do this.)

Anyway, the bottom line is that you can't rerun the target object's run() method by calling Thread.run(). But you can call the target object's run() method directly ... if you have the target reference.

share|improve this answer
    
If the Thread.exit will assign null to the target, wouldnt calling the target's run method cause a NullPointerException? I just tried calling d.run() after the threads completed but didnt get a NullPointerException even though at this point the object should be null. –  ziggy Dec 10 '11 at 14:30
    
You won't get an NPE. Read my 2nd paragraph again ... in particular, what it says about the case where target is null. Better yet, look at the source code of the Thread class yourself. –  Stephen C Dec 10 '11 at 14:41
    
so it is not possible to know the real reason(s) that they do this >> Stephen, the bug is from 1.0.2, since Oracle took over, they removed a lot of bug references. I clearly remember the code back in '99, still the same. Either way, the aggressive removal was helping the gc due to thread leaking and other stuff. Now it's still cool as sometimes the threads are still leaked. –  bestsss Dec 10 '11 at 14:57
    
@ziggy, you can rerun the thread in UnhandledExceptionHandler, though –  bestsss Dec 10 '11 at 14:57
    
@bestsss - that was what I thought. But I wondered if there were other reasons too. –  Stephen C Dec 11 '11 at 3:33

If you extend the Thread class, it'd work. Now it checks the Runnable target which is null after Thread.exit()

share|improve this answer

Synchronize access to the state of the object DieThread

synchronized(this) {
    System.out.println("             " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
    System.out.println("y is " + y);
    y++;
    System.out.println("y is " + y);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was not really worried about the state of the object. I am more interested in what happens after the threads have completed being a thread. –  ziggy Dec 10 '11 at 13:41

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