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This is a follow up question from Safe in C# not in C++, simple return of pointer / reference,

Is this:

person* NewPerson(void)
{
  person p;
  /* ... */
  return &p; //return pointer to person.
}

the same as?

person* NewPerson(void)
{
  person* pp = new person;

  return pp; //return pointer to person.
}

I know that the first one is a bad idea, because it will be a wild pointer. In the second case, will the object be safe on the heap - and like in c# go out of scope when the last reference is gone to it?

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1  
neither of these is C# code. The second one is a memory leak in C++ if you don't manually release it. –  CodesInChaos Dec 10 '11 at 17:00
    
They're not the same, and both are a Bad Idea. –  Kerrek SB Dec 10 '11 at 17:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's safe, the object will still be alive after the return.

But don't expect the object to be automatically cleaned up for you in C++. Standard C++ does not have garbage collection. You'll need to delete the object yourself, or use some form of smart pointer.

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Yes, the second case is safe.

But the caller will need to delete the returned pointer. You could change this to use boost::shared_ptr and it will be destroyed when it is no longer in use:

boost::shared_ptr<person> NewPerson()
{
    boost::shared_ptr<person> pp = boost::make_shared<person>();

    return pp;
}

If C++11 then you can use std::shared_ptr or std::unique_ptr.

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ok if the referenced pointers is set to 0 (null)? Or out of scope, like in c# –  Niklas Dec 10 '11 at 17:06
    
If it goes out of scope or you set to NULL by calling reset() on the returned smart pointer. –  hmjd Dec 10 '11 at 17:09
person* NewPerson(void)
{
  person* pp = new person;

  return pp; //return pointer to person.
}

I know that the first one is a bad idea, because it will be a wild pointer. In the second case, will the object be safe on the heap - and like in c# go out of scope when the last reference is gone to it?

Correct on the first one: it would be returning a pointer to data on that functin's stack, which will be reclaimed and modified once the function finishes.

On the second case: the object is created on the heap, which is separate from the execution stack. When the function finishes, the object on the heap is safe and stays the same. However, C++ does not automatically do garbage collection, so if you lost all of the references to a heap object, this would constitute a memory leak--the object's space would not be reclaimed until the program ended.

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The latter is safe. However, C++ does not (usually) provide garbage-collection, and thus you need to arrange for an explicit delete of the returned object.

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Like you say, the first case is bad as the pointer will not be valid. As for the second case, memory in C++ is not managed, you have to clean up after yourself. C++ doesn't keep track of references on normal pointer, that's what std::shared_ptr is for.

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