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A application is storing its status in a file on the server /temp/status.txt. There are 4 status possible: wait, ready, recording, finished. With a cronjob I would like to start a shell script that checks this file and take action as follows:

  • wait -> do nothing
  • ready -> execute ffmpeg -f x11grab -s cif -r 25 -i :0.0 /tmp/out.mpg. Now while ffmpeg captures, the status.txt file still has to be checked for a change to the status,
  • recording -> do nothing
  • finished -> send q command to ffmpeg process to quit capturing process and finish script.

I tried to solve it with expect and xdotool to realize that this absolutely the wrong way. My problem is that I acutally have no experience in bash and handling processes, child processes etc.

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What did you try? Update the post and tell us where you had problems. –  jman Dec 10 '11 at 17:10
    
Based on his comments to answers below, he wants to send the proper 'q' command to ffmpeg. I got here because that's what I want to do to. Nobody has answered how to do that, if it's even possible, or if ffmpeg has another method for quitting from a bash script, like ffmpeg -q or something (but I just checked and -q does something complicated and isn't for quitting). –  Colin Keenan Sep 14 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

Get The ProcessID and use,

c#

     Process p=Process.GetProcessByID(int);
     p.Close();
     p.Dispose();
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Is there a way not to need C# for that ? –  Nikana Reklawyks Oct 20 '12 at 0:50

I don't quite understand if your problem is that you don't know how to start writing the script at all or if you simply have a problem with a single one of your points Could you clarify your question?

I'm going to assume that your problem is that you don't know how to stop ffmpeg while it is running, the usual dirty way to stop a process is pkill, as in pkill ffmpeg, this should work for most purposes.

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Obviously I am newbie in bash scripting. I have read a lot about piping, processes, background processes and subprocesses, but I am still very uncertain. I do know how to write a script, I know with the ffmpeg command I do start a subprocess and I know how to write a while statement to check the status file. What I don't know exactly is how to control the ffmpeg subprocess, I would like to send the proper q command for quitting it, or is just pkill ffmpeg a correct solution? What if there are 2 ffmpeg processes running? –  lunacafu Dec 12 '11 at 17:03
    
Yes, lunacafu, I am in the same position now that you were in 3 years ago. I also want to be able to send the proper 'q' command to the same ffmpeg process that the bash script started, and I want to have the possibility of 2 or more ffmpeg process running while just quitting one of them. Did you find a solution? Can anyone actually answer this question? –  Colin Keenan Sep 14 at 14:44

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