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I've been looking for a way to produce the following HTML table with CSS:

<style type="text/css">
    table.frm tr td { vertical-align: top; padding-right: 10px; }
</style>

<table class="frm">
  <tr>
    <td rowspan="2">Label 1:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
    <td rowspan="2">Label 2:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Validation Message 1</td>
    <td>Validation Message 2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td rowspan="2">Label 3:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
    <td rowspan="2">Label 4:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Validation Message 3</td>
    <td>Validation Message 4</td>
  </tr>
</table>

The problem I've been having when I try to replace this with divs is that I can't align both the columns and the rows. I've tried using floats to align the columns, but then I loose the vertical alignment of the rows. But if I use a clear to align the rows, I loose the horizontal alignment of the columns.

Many of the examples I've seen for converting tables to divs use fixed or percentage widths, but I want the layout to have the same fluid behavior of the table since the validation messages may or may not appear and the labels/fields will have varying sizes.

Is there a designer out there who can show me how this layout can be achieved without tables? Thanks!

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4  
Well I say use tables. Tables are there to organise things in a table-like manner. Divs are there to create block-level elements. Use the right tools for the right job, don't try to put a square peg in a round hole, etc. etc. etc.. –  Niet the Dark Absol Dec 10 '11 at 17:07
    
I would tend to agree with you, but the design types immediately scowl when they see a table tag! –  Paul Dec 10 '11 at 22:30
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not a problem with display (CSS2), but it requires IE7+. Please see this example fiddle:

Markup:

<form>
    <span>
        <label for="edit1">First label:</label><input id="edit1" type="text" />
        <label for="edit2">Second label:</label><input id="edit2" type="text" />
    </span>
    <span>
        <br /><p>That sounds right!</p>
        <br /><p>Problem!</p>
    </span>        
    <span>
        <label for="edit3">3:</label><input id="edit3" type="text" />
        <label for="edit4">Fourth and last label:</label><input id="edit4" type="text" />
    </span>
    <span>
        <br /><p>No succes. Try again and enter another value.</p>
        <br /><p>Wait...</p>
    </span>        
</form>

Style sheet:

form {
    display: table;
}
form span {
    display: table-row;
}
form span * {
    vertical-align: top;
    padding-right: 10px;
    display: table-cell;
}
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This is similar to what I would have done. It's a form. No one should care that it was once laid out in a table. –  Rob Dec 10 '11 at 22:47
    
That's very close to what I was looking for. I replaced the br tags with empty p tags and that achieved the behavior I was looking for (i.e. if there are no validation messages, the row between collapses). I updated the fiddle (jsfiddle.net/gHgdf/2). –  Paul Dec 10 '11 at 23:10
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The problem you're facing is you are looking at each cell as its own little block of data. You need to look at the bigger picture. What is that collection of data? Is it actually a list of things? Does it belong in a ul or dl?

Quit trying to make this look like a table with different elements when it's not a table at all. And tables should never be used for layout.

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I'm not trying to make it look like a table, I'm trying to make it behave like a table. For example, I want the input fields in the second and fourth columns to all align, if the validation messages appear/hide I want the entire row to shift accordingly, etc. –  Paul Dec 10 '11 at 22:36
    
@Paul - What you have is a form but you are trying to make it behave like a table instead. NGLN, above, worked out something similar to what I was going to show. –  Rob Dec 10 '11 at 22:46
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its a hard work, right now there is no solution for this :( but try:

http://www.sitepoint.com/rowspans-colspans-in-css-tables/

hope this helps

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Fluid is very vague term, by fluid do you mean its width can expand and contract like a table does for different size screens, or when the browser window is resized? Or do you want he column widths to all adjust to same width as the cell with the longest/largest content?

The first is done like so

<div style="position: absolute; width: 100%;">
    <div style="position: relative; width: 100%; clear: both;">
        <div style="position: relative; width: 50%; float: left;"> </div>
        <div style="position: relative; width: 50%; float: left;"> </div>
    </div>
    <div style="position: relative; width: 100%; clear: both;">
        <div style="position: relative; width: 50%; float: left;"> </div>
        <div style="position: relative; width: 50%; float: left;"> </div>
    </div>
</div>

That should simulate two rows with two columns in each row and widths are based on the screen size.

The second with the columns adjusting based on the content size.

<div style="position: absolute; width: 100%;">
    <div style="position: relative; float: left;">
        <div style="position: relative; min-width: 1%; max-width: 75%;"> </div>
        <div style="position: relative; min-width: 1%; max-width: 75%;"> </div>
    </div>
    <div style="position: relative; float: left;">
        <div style="position: relative; min-width: 1%; max-width: 75%;"> </div>
        <div style="position: relative; min-width: 1%; max-width: 75%;"> </div>
    </div>
</div>

That is two columns with with two rows each. Set the "min-width" and "max-width" to whatever you need. I don't think I have ever had a reason to test anything like this, so if it doesn't work you could try setting "display: inline" for each row.

And If neither of these work try posting your test code. I am certain you can make a tables out of divs. A while back after several years of not using tables I inadvertently made a site, that should have used tables, out of divs. What your looking to do can be done it is just a matter of working the CSS.

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float: left; and position: relative; are conflicting statements, -1 –  tereško Dec 10 '11 at 20:39
    
@tereško if that is true so would position: static; which unless position is otherwise defined is the default for an elements. And besides the first example works, and in all browsers. So you voted against a working idea? I figured the second would have problems but it demonstrates a concept that with a bit of work might produce a solution. –  Krik Dec 10 '11 at 22:50
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