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I've agreed to write a graphical display program for the DGT chessboard used in UK chessboxing competitions. The current display is designed for basic functionality rather than crowd-pleasing entertainment so I figured it wouldn't be too difficult to jazz things up a little with my own version...

While I've designed graphical applications before, I've not really done anything with USB devices and am unsure where to start. I've managed to get some drivers and can run the manufacturer's test program but am not sure where to go next or how to get started. There is documentation for the driver on the DGT website but my C++ is extremely rusty (never used a dll) and I'm not quite sure how to translate this into other languages (got fired from the only c++ job I ever had within 6 months... ):

Sooo.... I'm thinking the way forward may be to write a very simple c++ program which takes input from the DGT driver DLL and "broadcasts" the piece positions and clock data somehow in a nice, easy to use format. Then, I'll have an Air app which can listen to these broadcasts and update its whizz-bang graphics accordingly. Only reason I'm going with Air is that the most recent graphical stuff I've done was in Flashpunk, which I rather like to use. If anyone has any good reasons why I should look in to something else, then I'd be happy to do so.

[edit] looks like I lost half of my original post somehow (the bit with the actual question!), will try to remember the rest and rewrite it below here: [/edit]

My main question is: what's the best way for a Flash/Air app to receive messages from the c++ boradcast app? Sockets? Reading/writing to a file? Exposing a function somehow?

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closed as not constructive by Mat, Pubby, Bo Persson, casperOne Dec 10 '11 at 20:51

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This isn't a great fit for the site. You could try Reddit. –  Pubby Dec 10 '11 at 18:10
    
I apologise, I did somehow manage to lose the actual question from my initial post, so can see how this comes across as not really being suitable for SO. At the end of the day though, I'm looking for help with some aspects of programming that I don't quite understand yet. That's what SO is about, no? –  BigglesB Dec 10 '11 at 19:04

1 Answer 1

I've actually worked with DGT boards with in a project at university. What we did was to first write what we called a board communicator that handled all the communication with the board. This is clearly something needs to work well, otherwise everything else would be a pain. I'd advice you to start with that before doing any fancy GUI stuff.

There is a standard way of representing chess games called PGN (Portable Game Notation, see here. You should implement this and make your GUI application read that. This makes it really easy to plug in some other user interface if you'd like.

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Hi Tobier, exactly how I plan to proceed. However, before I start to write the communicator, I want to be sure that it is physically possible for it to communicate with an Air/Flash program running on the same computer. It's not something I've got much experience with (usually just write stand-alone stuff). What's the best way for a Flash/Air app to receive messages from the c++ boradcast app? Sockets? Reading/writing to a file? Exposing a function somehow? –  BigglesB Dec 10 '11 at 19:06
    
I don't know about Air/Flash, but sockets sounds like a good idea to me. That would mean that the communicator does not have to be on the machine running the Air/Flash application. –  tobier Dec 10 '11 at 20:16

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