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This is the code I created for a project. Its basic stuff but I must have overlooked something because when I run it, no matter what number I put on the radious it gives me the same answer:

radious given:288  
x=260444.

why is that?

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#define pi 3.14

using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;


class Circle 
{
private:          
    int Radious;
public:
    bool setRadious(int R);
    int getRadious(){return Radious;}
    double getx();
};


bool Circle::setRadious(int R)
{   
    bool RadiousSet = false;

    if (R > 0) //check validity of R
    {
        int Radious = R;
        RadiousSet = true;
    }     
    return RadiousSet;
}

//x = pi *R^2
double Circle::getx()
{
    return  pi*pow(Radious,2);
}

// -----------------------------

int main()
{
    int R=0;
    bool rslt;

    Circle myCircle;  


    cout<<"Give Radious: ";
    cin>>R;
    rslt = myCircle.setRadious(R);

    if(rslt == true) 
    {
        cout << "Radious given: " <<myCircle.getRadious();
        cout<<"x: "<<myCircle.getx()<<endl;
    }
    else
        cout<<"Radious must be greater than zero"<<endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;

}
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3  
it should be radius not radious :) –  Templar Dec 10 '11 at 19:23
2  
yes, i know but the professor wrote it that way and we had to modify his code to make it work.. :) –  System Dec 10 '11 at 19:29

4 Answers 4

Change this:

if (R > 0) //check validity of R
{
    int Radious = R;
    RadiousSet = true;
} 

to this:

if (R > 0) //check validity of R
{
    Radious = R;
    RadiousSet = true;
} 

You are redeclaring Radious as a local variable which shadows the one you want. Its value is lost after the function returns.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! what a stupid mistake... :) –  System Dec 10 '11 at 19:34
    
@System: If you turn the warning level of your compiler up. The compiler will warn you about mistakes like this. –  Loki Astari Dec 10 '11 at 19:38
    
@Loki how can I do this? my compiler is dev c++ –  System Dec 10 '11 at 19:47
    
Dev C++... I remember those days. :) There should be an option somewhere where you can add cmdline arguments. Add -Wall to it. –  Mysticial Dec 10 '11 at 19:52

This line

int Radious = R;

should just read

Radious = R;

You are create a local variable (function level) which shadows the class level variable. You are then assign R to that variable which is then destroyed when it leave scope.

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You are redeclaring your Radius variable at local scope in the setRadious function.

Change:

int Radious = R;

to:

Radious = R;

C++ allows you to declare variables with the same name at different scopes. Because you are declaring it again in this method, it is setting the local version and does not affect the member variable in any way.

share|improve this answer
bool Circle::setRadious(int R)
{   
 bool RadiousSet = false;

  if (R > 0) //check validity of R
  {
     int Radious = R;  // <== problematic line
     RadiousSet = true;
  }     
    return RadiousSet;
}

You create and assign a local Radious. Remove the int in front of it, that will cause it to assign R to the member variable Radious.

It should be "Radius" btw.

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