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I'm developing a web application using spring.

Here's the problem, say I have these three urls,

www.sample.com/login.do

www.sample.com/homePage.do

www.sample.com/about.jsp

What I want to do is about.jsp page should be able to access even if user is logged in or not. And if user is not logged in and try to access homePage.do he should be redirected to login.do page and vice versa.

I think for this to work I need HTTPSessions, but I don't know how to manage HTTPSessions in Spring.

Can I accomplish this using some filters? If so can you please guide me through it?

I'm hoping to use Spring MVC and/or Spring Annotations.

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1  
This should be pretty easy with Spring Security. –  gouki Dec 11 '11 at 5:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Spring Security!

Your spring config file will be look a bit like

<security:http auto-config="true" use-expressions="true">

  <security:intercept-url pattern="login.do" access="permitAll"/>
  <security:intercept-url pattern="about.jsp" access="permitAll"/>
  <security:intercept-url pattern="homePage.do" access="isAuthenticated"/>

  <security:form-login
    login-page="login.jsp"
    authentication-failure-url="login?error=true"
    default-target-url="homePage.do"/>  
 </security:http>

 <security:authentication-manager>
         ...
 </security:authentication-manager>
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Thanks for the reply. I'll look into this method as well. For the moment what I'm doing is I wrote a Filter for these url patterns (actually I changed all statefull urls to *.html ) *.do and *.html. If any stateless url request having active session it will redirect to home page via filter and vice versa. Would that be ok to do so? –  sYl3r Dec 11 '11 at 19:35
1  
I second gouki and Ralph . You could use a filter but you could better achieve this though Spring Security . It's just configurations and will separate out the Security layer from the rest of your code . Give this a serious thought. –  Aravind A Dec 12 '11 at 8:16
    
@sYl3r: Of course you can implement your own filter (and what you described sounds ok). But instead of spending your time in writing, debugging, fixing and maintaining your own solution, you could also use this time to learn spring-security. I believe lerning spring-security is the better choice because it is a mature, often used and powerfull framework. And for security concerns it is always better to use a mature framework than an own implementation. –  Ralph Dec 12 '11 at 8:56
    
Hi, well I read about spring-security and thought jdbc-user-service would do what I want. Well one small thing I want to know. If I want to access the logged in user's details(like session variables) through a controller. How do I do that? –  sYl3r Dec 12 '11 at 13:30
1  
You'll get the details here –  Aravind A Dec 15 '11 at 5:46

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