Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I’m refactoring some code and adding a method which will replace a (soon-to-be) deprecated method. The new method has the following signature:

FooResult Foo(FooArgs args) { ... }

The deprecated method contained a growing list of parameters. These parameters are now properties on the FooArgs class. The deprecated method has several guard conditions which checked for null values with the following structure:

if (parameter1 == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“parameter1”);
if (parameter... == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“parameter...”);
if (parameterN == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“parameterN”);

Now that the parameters have been collapsed into the FooArgs class should I throw an ArgumentNullException for the individual properties of the FooArgs parameter:

if (args.Property1 == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“args.Property1”);
if (args.Property... == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“args.Property...”);
if (args.PropertyN == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“args.PropertyN”);

Or to throw a more general ArgumentException for the entire FooArgs parameter:

if (args.Property1 == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property1 cannot be null.”, “args”);
if (args.Property... == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property... cannot be null.”, “args”);
if (args.PropertyN == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property2 cannot be null.”, “args”);

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Did the Closers really read the question? –  Henk Holterman Dec 10 '11 at 21:04
4  
Not sure why this has been closed. Seems like a perfectly reasonable question to me. Anyway, I'd like to add this: if you have control of the FooArgs class, and if the properties should never be null, you could delegate the checking to the class itself. –  Matthew Strawbridge Dec 10 '11 at 21:05
1  
I've removed the words "best practice" from the title and the question itself in hopes of elimnating the concerns that closed it. –  John Laffoon Dec 10 '11 at 21:05
    
Isn't this exactly what code contracts are for in .Net 4.0? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd264808.aspx –  dash Dec 10 '11 at 21:10
1  
have you considered a solution where parameter are valid and consistent objects with no nulls? example class may be ProcessStartInfo where you can set FileName to null and it will stil return empty string not null. This is some kind of null object pattern. i'm asking because this approach for more complicated objects may be inconvenient –  wiero Dec 10 '11 at 21:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You need to add a check for the args itself to be non-null. The ANE is not appropriate for individual components, so you need to use more general AE, like this:

if (args == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException(“args”);
if (args.Property1 == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property1 cannot be null.”, “args”);
if (args.Property... == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property... cannot be null.”, “args”);
if (args.PropertyN == null)
    throw new ArgumentException(“Property2 cannot be null.”, “args”);
share|improve this answer
    
ArgumentException is more generic and should only really be used for invalid arguments. Whereas ArgumentNullException is specific to arguments that are passed in as null references where a null reference is invalid. –  Samuel Slade Dec 10 '11 at 20:57
4  
@Slade This is exactly correct: if args is null, ANE is thrown; if args is not null, but one of its components is null (which of course makes args invalid) the more general AE is thrown. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 10 '11 at 20:59

While I agree completely with dasblinkenlight's answer, you may also want to consider moving the validation for FooArgs into the FooArgs class itself. If this class is designed specifically to move arguments around, it is likely not valid for it to have null proeprties, in which case, I would allow it's constructor to do it's validation.

share|improve this answer
    
While dasblinkenlight's answer contained the explanation I was looking for, I'll definitely look into this approach. Thanks! –  John Laffoon Dec 10 '11 at 22:29

In this case, it may be best to check for a null reference of the FooArgs parameter inside that method, and throw an ArgumentNullException if a null reference has been passed in. Then if other methods or sections of code use the parameters contained within the args class, they should be the ones to check this and throw exceptions as necessary. However, if your method that takes in the args class is the one to use all the arguments, then it would be better to check for valid parameters in that method, as you suggested.

Also, use ArgumentNullException only for arguments that are null references. If it's simply an invalid value (for example an empty string), then you should use the more generic ArgumentException.

share|improve this answer

This kind of depends on your tooling and how you feel about your tooling (resharper, fxcops and the like). Some static code analysis tools accept this:

throw new ArgumentNullException(“args.Property...”,"args");

and reject this

throw new ArgumentNullException(“args.Property...”,"args.Property");

So if you want to use the tooling, then assertions of null-hood against a parameter property must throw an ArgumentException

It's also valid to just make it up as you go along. What ever communicates the right message to the maintenance developer to help him pass the parameters correctly is the correct message.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.