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I have a Dictionary with doubles as values and strings as keys.

I want to count occurrences of each value in this Dictionary and I want to know this value (that is for instance repeated).

for instance :

key1, 2
key2, 2
key3, 3
key4, 2
key5, 5
key6, 5

i want to get a list :

2 - 3 (times)
3 - 1 (once)
5 - 2 (twice)

How can I do it ?

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1  
A little more info: Are you asking a count of the values that are not repeated? Could you give us an example of data, and your desired output? –  Alan Dec 10 '11 at 21:19
5  
Testing doubles for equality is a very questionable practice. You might want to avoid mentioning it if you want an answer. Using Linq's Distinct().Count() on the Values property is otherwise an approach that matches your tags well. –  Hans Passant Dec 10 '11 at 21:21
2  
And how do you want to test the Equality of the doubles here? –  Henk Holterman Dec 10 '11 at 21:21
    
possible duplicate of Distinct Values in Dictionary<TKey,TValue> –  Factor Mystic Dec 10 '11 at 21:30
    
@FactorMyst : no, this is not a dupe of that question. –  Henk Holterman Dec 10 '11 at 21:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first thing to note, is that you don't actually care about the keys of the dictionary. Step one therefore is to ignore them as irrelevant to the task in hand. We're going to work with the Values property of the dictionary, and the work is much the same as for any other collection of integers (or indeed any other enumerable of any other type we can compare for equality).

There are two common approaches to this problem, both of which are well worth knowing.

The first uses another dictionary to hold the count of values:

//Start with setting up the dictionary you described.
Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>{
    {"key1", 2},
    {"key2", 2},
    {"key3", 3},
    {"key4", 2},
    {"key5", 5},
    {"key6", 5}
};
//Create a different dictionary to store the counts.
Dictionary<int, int> valCount = new Dictionary<int, int>();
//Iterate through the values, setting count to 1 or incrementing current count.
foreach(int i in dict.Values)
    if(valCount.ContainsKey(i))
        valCount[i]++;
    else
        valCount[i] = 1;
//Finally some code to output this and prove it worked:
foreach(KeyValuePair<int, int> kvp in valCount)//note - not sorted, that must be added if needed
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", kvp.Key, kvp.Value);

Hopefully this is pretty straightforward. Another approach is more complicated but has some pluses:

//Start with setting up the dictionary you described.
Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>{
    {"key1", 2},
    {"key2", 2},
    {"key3", 3},
    {"key4", 2},
    {"key5", 5},
    {"key6", 5}
};
IEnumerable<IGrouping<int, int>> grp = dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x);
//Two options now. One is to use the results directly such as with the
//equivalent code to output this and prove it worked:
foreach(IGrouping<int, int> item in grp)//note - not sorted, that must be added if needed
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", item.Key, item.Count());
//Alternatively, we can put these results into another collection for later use:
Dictionary<int, int> valCount = grp.ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());
//Finally some code to output this and prove it worked:
foreach(KeyValuePair<int, int> kvp in valCount)//note - not sorted, that must be added if needed
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", kvp.Key, kvp.Value);

(We'd probably use var rather than the verbose IEnumerable<IGrouping<int, int>>, but it's worth being precise when explaining code).

In a straight comparison, this version is inferior - both more complicated to understand and less efficient. However, learning this approach allows for some concise and efficient variants of the same technique, so it's worth examining.

GroupBy() takes an enumeration and creates another enumeration that contains key-value pairs where the value is an enumeration to. The lambda x => x means that what it is grouped by is itself, but we've the flexibilty for different grouping rules than that. The contents of grp looks a bit like:

{
  {Key=2, {2, 2, 2}}
  {Key=3, {3}}
  {Key=5, {5, 5}}
}

So, if we loop through this an for each group we pull out the Key and call Count() on the group, we get the results we want.

Now, in the first case we built up our count in a single O(n) pass, while here we build up the group in a O(n) pass, and then obtain the count in a second O(n) pass, making it much less efficient. It's also a bit harder to understand, so why bother mentioning it.

Well, the first is that once we do understand it we can turn the lines:

IEnumerable<IGrouping<int, int>> grp = dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x);
foreach(IGrouping<int, int> item in grp)
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", item.Key, item.Count());

Into:

foreach(var item in dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x))
  Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", item.Key, item.Count());

Which is quite concise, and becomes idiomatic. It's especially nice if we want to then go on and do something more complicated with the value-count pairs as we can chain this into another operation.

The version that puts the results into a dictionary can be even more concise still:

var valCount = dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());

There, your whole question answered in one short line, rather than the 6 (cutting out comments) for the first version.

(Some might prefer to replace dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x) with dict.GroupBy(x => x.Value) which will have exactly the same results once we run the Count() on it. If you aren't immediately sure why, try to work it out).

The other advantage, is that we have more flexibility with GroupBy in other cases. For these reasons, people who are used to using GroupBy are quite likely to start off with the one-line concision of dict.Values.GroupBy(x => x).ToDictinary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count()); and then change to the more verbose but more effient form of the first version (where we increment running totals in the new dictionary) if it proved a performance hotspot.

share|improve this answer

Even simpler would be:

Private Function CountOccurenceOfValue(dictionary As Dictionary(Of Integer, Integer), valueToFind As Integer) As Integer
    Return (From temp In dictionary Where temp.Value.Equals(valueToFind) Select temp).Count()
End Function

(Yes it's in VB.NET, but you shouldn't have much trouble to convert to C# :-) )

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User is asking for C#, and thus answer should be presented in C#. –  Neeko Nov 2 '14 at 17:55

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