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I'm trying to learn how to do the GUI stuff in java with coding style and this is what I've written :

import java.awt.Container;
import java.awt.Panel;

import javax.swing.*;

public class Class1 extends JFrame {


    public void createGUI()
    {
        JpanelMock jm = new JpanelMock();
        setTitle("Frame1");
        setSize(320,200);
        this.add(jm.drawGUI());

    }

    public static void main(String [] arg)
    {
        Class1 cls = new Class1();

        cls.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        cls.setVisible(true);
        cls.createGUI();
    }

}

//----------------------------JpanelMock.java


import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class JpanelMock extends JPanel {

    public JpanelMock() {

    }

    public Component drawGUI()
    {
        super.setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
        JButton b = new JButton("button 1");
        JLabel l = new JLabel("label 1");
        JTextField tf = new JTextField("text 1");
        this.add(b);
        this.add(l);
        this.add(tf);
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponent(g);
        //drawGUI();
    }

}

but when I start the program if I don't do anything related to redrawing event I can't see my yellow jpanel with a text + button in it. why is this happening?

share|improve this question
1  
1) setSize(320,200); Should be handled with layouts, borders & pack() 2) The logic of the 2nd class is contorted in that it extends JPanel but returns a Component 3) Don't override paintComponent() unless doing custom painting. 4) Neither class should extend anything but Object. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 11 '11 at 1:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Whenever I see a question such as yours, I don't have to look at the code. You're calling setVisible(true) on the JFrame before adding components to it. Change the order of this: call setVisible(true) on your JFrame only after all components have been added.

e.g.,

public static void main(String [] arg) {
    Class1 cls = new Class1();

    cls.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    // cls.setVisible(true); // *** removed
    cls.createGUI();
    cls.setVisible(true); // *** added
}
share|improve this answer

This is because you never call setVisible() method on any of your components.

You should only add a single line at the end of your main method: cls.setVisible(true);

share|improve this answer
    
You don't have to call setVisible(...) on any components, and in fact shouldn't. You just call it on the top-level window after adding all components to the GUI. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 10 '11 at 21:18
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels Top level window is a component too. You answered faster, of course. But I didn't honored the downwote. –  MockerTim Dec 10 '11 at 21:30
    
I'll remove it soon, it's more for the OP then for you. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 10 '11 at 21:36

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