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I am currently building some code that traverses through directorys listing all files and paths and file sizes. I am now stuck with the final part of the traverse process which is the if statement to make the code go into any encountered directories.

do {
    char *filename = entry->d_name;
    stat(filename,&buffer);
    if (S_ISDIR(buffer.st_mode)) {
        name = entry->d_name;
        chdir(name);
        if (strcmp(entry->d_name, ".") == 0 || strcmp(entry->d_name, "..") == 0)
            continue;
        listdir(name);     //THIS IS THE NAME OF THE FUNCTION THAT THIS SNIPPET IT FROM!
        chdir("..");
    }
    else
        printf("%s\t%d\n", entry->d_name,buffer.st_size);

Am so confused by trying to get it to cd into the directory that it encounters! ARGH!

share|improve this question
    
Could you post the function listdir() in full? –  hmjd Dec 10 '11 at 21:59
    
@Ollie: press the edit button and paste the code into the question. It's unreadable in a comment box. –  larsmans Dec 10 '11 at 22:05
    
What problem are you having? chdir should work with a relative directory. However, you may be missing the initial chdir to the top level directory you are listing? –  asc99c Dec 10 '11 at 22:06
    
Here is the dropbox link! dl.dropbox.com/u/26148849/minix.c –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 22:09
    
Check return value from chdir(), if -1 check errno for failure reason. –  hmjd Dec 10 '11 at 22:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem, when I executed, was stat() was failing.

This worked for me:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>

void listdir(const char* const name);

int main(void)
{
    listdir(getenv("PWD"));
    return 0;
}

void listdir(const char* const name)
{
    DIR *dir;
    struct dirent *entry;
    struct stat buffer;
    char* path = 0;

    if (!(dir = opendir(name)))
        return;
    if (!(entry = readdir(dir)))
        return;

    do {
        path =
            malloc((strlen(name) + strlen(entry->d_name) + 2) * sizeof(char));
        sprintf(path, "%s/%s", name, entry->d_name);

        if (-1 == stat(path,&buffer))
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "stat(%s) failed: %s\n",
                path, strerror(errno));
            exit(1);
        }
        else if (S_ISDIR(buffer.st_mode))
        {
            if (strcmp(entry->d_name, ".") != 0 && strcmp(entry->d_name, "..") != 0)
            {
                listdir(path);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            printf("%s\t%d\n", path, buffer.st_size);
        }
        free(path);
    } while (entry = readdir(dir));
    closedir(dir);
}

EDIT:

Removed call to chdir() as realised it was superfluous. This does provide listing but does not do it using chdir().

share|improve this answer
    
THANKS! now i just need to analyze every part that you have added so that i fully understand it! :-) –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 23:38
    
@Ollie, the main difference is it constructs the absolute path to each file/directory. –  hmjd Dec 10 '11 at 23:40
    
cheers man! Thank you so much! I just hope that this post doesn't get back to me as plagiarism, not that im going to copy and paste this and then continue working from it –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 23:54
    
@Ollie You chose to post the link to your .c file. Just don't plagiarize code and you won't get in trouble. –  NullUserException Dec 11 '11 at 2:05
    
haha what i meant was, i hope that they dont see that file and think that i took it off here, obviously i havent seeing as i wrote it... –  Charlie Dec 11 '11 at 2:07

First, you should use lstat. Second, with your chdir(name) call, you actually do go up into parent direectories (when name=".."), but never go back down.

share|improve this answer
    
to go back down would be chdir(".")? –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 22:33
    
@Ollie, no that will have no effect. Removing the chdir(name) prior to the strcmp() checks should fix this as described by jorgensen. –  hmjd Dec 10 '11 at 22:38
    
Ok thanks for all your help. It still isnt working for me despite making the above changes, I feel like i may have coded this incredibly wrong as it seems tolist files until it find the first directory and then just dies. –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 22:44
    
following those changes, all it does now is display the first file in the folder –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 22:50

The problems lie in this code:

if (S_ISDIR(buffer.st_mode)) {
    name = entry->d_name;
    chdir(name);
    if (strcmp(entry->d_name, ".") == 0 || strcmp(entry->d_name, "..") == 0)
        continue;
    listdir(name);     //THIS IS THE NAME OF THE FUNCTION THAT THIS SNIPPET IT FROM!
    chdir("..");
}

This is embedded in a do-while loop, but you don't show us how the directory entry is read.

The strcmp() conditions should be applied to the current directory before doing a chdir(); that is a 'dangerous' operation. When you're sure that you need to process the directory, then you can do chdir(), open a new directory stream, and process entries from the new stream - which is probably a recursive call, and then chdir() back again. Your jump after you've done chdir(..) (because you didn't check for .. before doing the chdir(name)) is going to wreak havoc on things.

You should look up fchdir() which might be better for the purpose of getting back to where you started.

share|improve this answer
    
Here is the whole code: dl.dropbox.com/u/26148849/minix.c I will look into those things you said things now –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 23:08
    
The issue i am having is that the chdir is chdir(<FILENAME>), would it not have to be chdir(</path/to/FILENAME>) (where filename the second time is the name of a directory)? –  Charlie Dec 10 '11 at 23:14
    
It doesn't have to be the full path name, though obviously that works. If you do chdir(name) where name is the entry read from the current directory, it will take you down one directory level - subject to the name not being a symlink. (They grotesquely complicate things; watch out for cycles in directories with symlinks.) –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 11 '11 at 2:15

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