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I'm trying to create a BMI calculator. This should allow people to use either metric or imperial measurements.

I realise that I could use hidden tags to solve my problem, but this has bugged me before so I thought I'd ask: I can use $_POST['variableName'] to find the submitted variableName field-value; but...I don't know, or see, how to verify which form was used to submit the variables.

My code's below (though I'm not sure it's strictly relevant to the question):

<?php

    	$bmiSubmitted 	= $_POST['bmiSubmitted'];


    	if (isset($bmiSubmitted)) {
    	$height		= $_POST['height'];
    	$weight		= $_POST['weight'];
    	$bmi		= floor($weight/($height*$height));

    	?>
    		<ul id="bmi">
    		<li>Weight (in kilograms) is: <span><?php echo "$weight"; ?></span></li>

    		<li>Height (in metres) is: <span><?php echo "$height"; ?></span></li>

    		<li>Body mass index (BMI) is: <span><?php echo "$bmi"; ?></span></li>

    		</ul>
    	<?php

    	}

    	else {
    	?>


    	<div id="formSelector">

    	<ul>
    		<li><a href="#metric">Metric</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#imperial">Imperial</a></li>
    	</ul>

    		<form name="met" id="metric" action="<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>" method="post" enctype="form/multipart">

    			<fieldset>

    			<label for="weight">Weight (<abbr title="Kilograms">kg</abbr>):</label>
    				<input type="text" name="weight" id="weight" />

    			<label for="height">Height (<abbr title="metres">m</abbr>):</label>
    				<input type="text" name="height" id="height" />

    			<input type="hidden" name="bmiSubmitted" id="bmiSubmitted" value="1" />

    			</fieldset>

    			<fieldset>

    				<input type="reset" id="reset" value="Clear" />

    				<input type="submit" id="submit" value="Submit" />

    			</fieldset>

    		</form>

    		<form name="imp" id="imperial" action="<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>" method="post" enctype="form/multipart">

    			<fieldset>

    			<label for="weight">Weight (<abbr title="Pounds">lbs</abbr>):</label>
    				<input type="text" name="weight" id="weight" />

    			<label for="height">Height (Inches):</label>
    				<input type="text" name="height" id="height" /    
    			<input type="hidden" name="bmiSubmitted" id="bmiSubmitted" value="1" />
    			</fieldset>

    			<fieldset>
    				<input type="reset" id="reset" value="Clear" />
    				<input type="submit" id="submit" value="Submit" />
    			</fieldset>
    		</form>

    	<?php
    	}

?>

I verified that it worked (though without validation at the moment -I didn't want to crowd my question too much) with metric; I've added the form but not the processing for the imperial yet.

Thanks for any help and (if it's ridiculously easy) I'll flagellate myself as required.

Cheers

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1  
As some have noted below, the form's name shouldn't really be important. If you need to distinguish data from one form or another it's probably better for each form to have a different action. –  rojoca May 10 '09 at 22:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 46 down vote accepted

To identify the submitted form, you can use:

  • A hidden input field.
  • The name or value of the submit button.

The name of the form is not sent to the server as part of the POST data.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for your second point. I was going to mention that myself. –  strager May 10 '09 at 20:17
    
another +1 for the second point. –  BrynJ May 10 '09 at 20:52
    
Accepted on the basis of that second point. Thanks! =) –  David Thomas May 10 '09 at 21:03
1  
Second point is great. –  jmucchiello May 10 '09 at 21:43
3  
We need more second point. –  Joey Robert May 10 '09 at 23:45

The form name is not submitted. You should just add a hidden field to each form and call it a day.

share|improve this answer
    
Really? That seems like a half-hearted implementation of forms... o.O Still, I feel better for being unable to see how it works. –  David Thomas May 10 '09 at 20:14
    
@ricebowl, A form's name is only useful for DOM manipulations and such. –  strager May 10 '09 at 20:15
    
I agree, this is the way to go. –  Chris B May 10 '09 at 20:16
1  
@ricebowl: understand, too, that this is how HTTP works. It has nothing to do with PHP. –  Narcissus May 10 '09 at 23:02
    
@Strager, I hadn't realised that 'til now. I thought it would have more use, for some reason. @Narcissus, I was intending my criticism, unjust as it may be, to be read as against browsers/http, rather than php. –  David Thomas May 11 '09 at 15:28

You can do like this :

<input type="text" name="myform[login]">
<input type="password" name="myform[password]">

check the posted values

if(isset($_POST['myform'])) {
    $values = $_POST['myform'];

    // $login = $values['login'];
    // ...
}
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in form submitting button (id method of form is post)

<input type="submit" value="save" name="commentData">

in php file

if(isset($_POST['commentData'])){
//code
}
share|improve this answer

As petervandijck.com pointed out, this code may be susceptible to XSS attacks if you have it behind some kind of log-in system or have it embedded in other code.

To prevent an XSS attack, where you have written:

<?php echo "$weight"; ?>

You should write instead:

<?php echo htmlentities($weight); ?>

Which could even be better written as:

<?=htmlentities($weight); ?>
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2  
<? ?> is not supported everywhere. I noticed some shared hosting, even when up-to-date has the option switch off in the php configuration file, even when php version is up-to-date –  happy Mar 14 '13 at 15:10

Only the names of the form fields are submitted, the name of the form itself is not. But you can set a hidden field with the name in it.

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You do realize that with echo $height; you are opening up a very, very serious security hole in your application, right?

share|improve this answer
    
I...didn't. Um, it was intended only to allow people to see, if the result was bizarrely out-of-expected-range, the input values. How...is this a security hole? Bearing in mind that, as part of the sanitising, the values, of either height or weight, are discarded and the user returned to the form with an error message. –  David Thomas May 11 '09 at 15:26
    
Of course, as noted by Thessaly, 'intent and outcome are so rarely coincident.' –  David Thomas May 11 '09 at 15:26
    
It's a serious security hole, google for xss attacks. Basically, someone can add some javascript in that variable, which then gets added to your page, which can then be used to steal the cookie of a logged-in user and access the application as them. BIG security hole :) –  PeterV May 19 '09 at 21:20
    
Unless I'm wrong, not I'm doubting myself –  PeterV May 19 '09 at 21:21
    
not sanitizing input is always a security risk. –  happy Mar 14 '13 at 15:11

for some reason , name of submit button isnot pass to superglobal $_POST when submited with ajax/jquery ,

Just in case its help someone..

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