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If subclassing a "class" in JavaScript is done like so:

var ParentClass = function() {
    // something
};


var ChildClass = function() {
    // something
};

ChildClass.prototype = new ParentClass();

... what should I do when the parent class has required parameters?

var ParentClass = function(requiredParameter) {
    if (typeof requiredParameter === 'undefined') {
        throw new TypeError("'requiredParameter' is required!");
    }
};


var ChildClass = function() {
    // something
};

ChildClass.prototype = new ParentClass();
// ^ Throws TypeError

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I use an "init" function and avoid "non-literal" prototypes (e.g. I use .prototype = { .... }. This is error, is of course, because new ParentClass() is eagerly invoked. –  user166390 Dec 10 '11 at 22:42
    
What do you mean by "non-static" prototypes? Do you mean redefining the methods for each new instance? –  Jonathan Chan Dec 10 '11 at 22:42
    
Updated for clarification :) –  user166390 Dec 10 '11 at 22:43
    
extend constructor functions by "cloning" their prototype, not by calling them. Clone objects by setting them as the constructor of a dummy function and invoking the function with new. See my (updated) answer. –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 10 '11 at 22:54
    
@pst Neat, and interesting. Thanks! –  Jonathan Chan Dec 11 '11 at 0:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Subclass it like this instead:

function clone (obj) {
  if (!obj) return;
  clone.prototype = obj;
  return new clone();
}

var ParentClass = function() {
    // something
};


var ChildClass = function() {
    // something
};

ChildClass.prototype = clone(ParentClass.prototype);
ChildClass.prototype.constructor = ChildClass; // if you want

Now you don't have to worry about it, because you don't have to call the parent constructor to subclass it :)

share|improve this answer
    
That clone function is broken. You forgot the line var clone = function () {};... –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:15
1  
As we established below (in my answer), there is Object.create which gets that job done. A custom clone function is therefore not needed. –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:20
1  
it works fine, i'll set up a jsfiddle if you want. As we established below Object.create is fairly recent, and this is a perfectly legitimate alternative and basically how it's been done for a long time. –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 10 '11 at 23:24
    
Yes, jsFiddle please. I don't think if works. –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:29
2  
Šime: jsfiddle.net/RsgJf ... Trevor, I agree that encapsulating all of this into some kind of 'inherit' function is cleaner. I'm just trying to keep things as close as possible to the original example. –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 11 '11 at 1:23

This is how its done:

function Parent( a ) {
    this.a = a;
}

function Child( a, b ) {
    Parent.call( this, a ); // this is crucial
    this.b = b;
}

Child.prototype = Object.create( Parent.prototype );
Child.prototype.constructor = Child;

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ECCgt/ (analyze the instances in the console)


The way you're doing it

ChildClass.prototype = new ParentClass();

is a dirty hack which is broken and should be avoided. Use Object.create to set up the inheritance relationship between the two prototype objects.

The second line

Child.prototype.constructor = Child;

is somewhat optional. We are correcting the constructor property because we had to overwrite Child.prototype in order to set up the inheritance. If you don't care about the constructor property, just leave out that line.

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't Object.create fairly new? –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 10 '11 at 23:10
1  
It's part of ES5, so you'll need to implement it yourself for IE8 and under cases...or non updated browsers. –  Trevor Dec 10 '11 at 23:13
    
@user886931 No, its' 2 years old. You need the ES5 shim if you care about older browsers... –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:13
1  
I guess we have different ideas of "fairly new" ;) –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 10 '11 at 23:16
2  
@user886931 It's irrelevant anyway. There is ES5 shim, so you can safely use Object.create. Case closed. –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:18

A better way to inherit...

var inherit = (function () {
  var F = function () {}; // cache function
  return function (C, P) { // Accepts Constructor and Parent
    F.prototype = P.prototype;
    // faster prototype chain lookup than direct instantiation
    C.prototype = new F(); 
    C._super = P.prototype;
    C.prototype.constructor = C; // for checking instanceof
  };
}());
share|improve this answer
    
afaik it's safe to put F outside inherit, that way you can reuse the same function instead of creating a new one for each call to inherit. It might be a bit more efficient. –  Dagg Nabbit Dec 10 '11 at 23:21
1  
Why is that function in parens? It's not an immediately invoked function expression... –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '11 at 23:21
1  
I forgot the parens :P –  Trevor Dec 10 '11 at 23:42
    
That's why I return a function instead of creating F each time it's used. –  Trevor Dec 11 '11 at 0:09
    
Without arguments? It accepts the constructor and the parent. @LeeGee –  Trevor Jun 28 '14 at 11:37

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