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I want to override the standard memcpy with what the one in the AsmLib library.

The documentation says:

If you use the "override" version of the asmlib library then you don’t have to modify the program source code. All you have to do is to link the appropriate version of asmlib into your project.

Which is what I have done, I have added "alibcof64o.lib" to additional dependencies, in both Debug and release configurations.

When I compile in Debug, it works fine, when I look at the disassembly it will call the A_memcpy, with SSE instructions. However, when I compile with Release, it will not call A_memcpy, but the regular one.


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Have you tried /Oi- compilation flag as the documentation suggests? – Banthar Dec 11 '11 at 0:01
I missed that part! Thank you. – ronag Dec 11 '11 at 0:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Release mode includes optimizations. A lot of optimizations affect the way memcpy gets invoked.

For example, the number of bytes to be copied can be determined at compile time, it is a massive optimization not to call the generic memcpy implementation. Similarly, if the compiler can determine that the source and destinations are aligned, optimizations are possible beyond calling the default memcpy.

In any event, the standard memcpy is already heavily optimized for all platforms, including using SSE2, so I'm not sure why you're bothering.

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Well, the AsmLib contains some optimization which the default implementation doesn't use, e.g. string functions with SSE4.2. I assume these will suffer from the same problem. I only choose memcpy as an first try as it is most common. – ronag Dec 10 '11 at 23:40
Also looking at the benchmarks included with asmlib, the memcpy there is between 10%-500% faster than the default visual studio 2008 one. – ronag Dec 10 '11 at 23:41
I doubt it's possible for the AsmLib optimizations to outweigh the optimizations that are only possible in the invocation. Any memcpy replacement will always need a function call and return, always require putting the length in a register, never permit taking advantage of cases where the size is known at compile time (or known to be a multiple of 2 or 4 at compile time), never permit taking advantage of alignments known at compile time, and so on. It would take a lot of micro-optimizations to outweigh that. – David Schwartz Dec 10 '11 at 23:41
I see. That makes sense. – ronag Dec 10 '11 at 23:42

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