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I have the following code that outputs 6,720. However after looking at the code I have no idea how the 720 is being gotten.

def f(n):
    if (n==0):
        return 1
    else:
        v = f(n-1)
        r = n * v
        return r

n = 6
print(n, f(n))
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Have you tried to use pdb? –  jcollado Dec 10 '11 at 23:56
2  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factorial (search for "recursive" on that page.) –  Sven Marnach Dec 10 '11 at 23:56
1  
And en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion –  schnaader Dec 10 '11 at 23:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
f(6) = 6  *  f(5)                                    = 720
              |------------------------------------
              5  *  f(4)                             = 120
                     |-----------------------------
                     4  *  f(3)                      =  24
                            |----------------------
                            3  * f(2)                =   6
                                  |----------------
                                  2  *  f(1)         =   2
                                         |---------
                                         1  *  f(0)  =   1
                                                |
                                                1    =   1  (base case)
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Your function uses a technique called recursion.

  • f(6) is 6 * f(5). Since f(5) is 120 (proof below), this gives 720.
  • f(5) is 5 * f(4). Since f(4) is 24 (proof below), this gives 120.
  • etc...
  • f(0) is 1.
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Your f function is calculating the factorial of its argument. It is often represented with the exclamation symbol.

Put simply that would be:

6! = 6 * 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1

Your loop recursively calls itself, so that it calculates the value for 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, whereupon it stops recursing when it hits 0. Then f starts to return. This is where your 720 value is coming from.

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Python includes a trace module that shows you exactly what is going on.

Here's the output for your script:

~/tmp $ python3.2 -m trace --trace fact.py
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: <module>
fact.py(1): def f(n):
fact.py(9): n = 6
fact.py(10): print(n, f(n))
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(5):         v = f(n-1)
 --- modulename: fact, funcname: f
fact.py(2):     if (n==0):
fact.py(3):         return 1
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
fact.py(6):         r = n * v
fact.py(7):         return r
6 720
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