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Environment: Microsoft Visual Studio 2010

Coding standard: C++0x compatible

I have a class template

template <typename T1, int I>
class A
{
    public template <typename T2> void f(T2 x);
    /*...*/
};

template <typename T1, int I>
template <typename T2>
void A<T1, I>::f(T2 x)
{
    /*...*/
}

and partial specialization of above class

template <int I>
class A<char, I>
{
    public template <typename T2> void f(T2 x);
    /*...*/
};

Then can I specialize member function in the partially specialized class like below?

template <int I>
template <>
void A<char, I>::f<double>(double x)
{
}

Thanks!

NB: I'm not working on it but thinking if it's applicable or not. Easy rating if you know about the rule.

share|improve this question
6  
public void? Did you actually try to compile this? – Pubby Dec 11 '11 at 0:34
    
@Pubby THANKS. Any constructive idea about my question? – Y.Z Dec 11 '11 at 0:47
1  
You still didn't try to compile... hint C++ is not C# in terms of accessibility specifications. – Xeo Dec 11 '11 at 0:50
    
For some reason I recall this not being possible out-of-class. Someone else can tell you why/why not. – Pubby Dec 11 '11 at 0:50
    
@Xeo hmm...what's it then? Perhaps just can't specialize member functions without its class being fully specialized? – Y.Z Dec 11 '11 at 1:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is invalid because you cannot explicitly specialize a member function without also giving fixed template arguments to any enclosing class template.

Not C++11 compatible, but working on MSVC

The Microsoft compiler has an extension that allows to declare explicit specializations within class templates though. Even though I have never tried it, chances are good that it will accept the following non-standard code

template <int I>
class A<char, I>
{
    public:
    template <typename T2> void f(T2 x);

    template<> void f<double>(double x) {

    }
    /*...*/
};

Update: Clang compiles this and reports

// clang++ -fms-extensions main1.cpp
main1.cpp:10:21: warning: explicit specialization of 'f' within class scope is a
                 Microsoft extension [-Wmicrosoft]

  template<> void f<double>(double x) {
                  ^

C++11/C++03 compatible

The way here is overloading instead of specialization

template <int I>
class A<char, I>
{
    public:
    template <typename T2> void f(T2 x);

    void f(double x) {

    }
    /*...*/
};
share|improve this answer
    
I think, this code code gives an error about this specialization... – Yappie Dec 11 '11 at 1:17
    
That's what I'm looking for and thank you Johannes. However the inline stuff may be problematic if applied to constructor in case of the inheretance of this class right? – Y.Z Dec 11 '11 at 1:20
    
I suppose the inline stuff problematic (inheretence, loops) and about to accept the overloading solution. – Y.Z Dec 11 '11 at 1:37

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