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I am trying to write a code to remove all the leading, trailing and middle of the sentence spaces but to keep only one space between the words.

For example if the input is

"    This    is my     string    "

the output should be

"This is my string"

So far I have come up with this:

#include <stdio.h>
void cascade(char str[], int i);
main()
{
    char str[100] = "    This    is my     string    ";
    int i = 0;
    while (str[i] != '\0') {
            if (str[i] == ' ' && str[i + 1] == ' ')
                    cascade(str, i);
            i++;
    }
    printf("%s\n", str);
}

void cascade(char str[], int i)
{
    while(str[i] != '\0') {
            str[i] = str[i + 1];
            i++;
    }
    str[i + 1] = '\0';
}

I would appreciate if anyone could come up with some ideas, Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
are you allowed to use string functions? –  Daniel Haviv Dec 11 '11 at 1:05
    
Yes we can use the string.h library. –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 1:06
    
How do you define "word"? What should happen if your "words" contain tabs, newlines or other whitespace characters? –  Mark Byers Dec 11 '11 at 1:13
    
Notice that you are not merely trying to collapse multiple spaces into one space, you have the extra requirement of removing all spaces at the beginning and end of the string. That complicates things a little. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 11 '11 at 1:16
    
This is just a hard coded variable, so it wont change –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 1:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char* trim(char str[]){
    char *p=str;
    char *token;
    if(str == NULL) return NULL;
    if(*str == '\0') return str;

    token=strtok(str, " \t");
    if(token == NULL){
        *str = '\0';
        return str;
    }
    while(NULL!=token){
        int len;
        len = strlen(token);
        if(p != token){
            memmove(p, token, len);
        }
        p += len;
        *p++ =' ';
        token = strtok(NULL, " \t");
    }
    p[-1]='\0';

    return str;
}

int main(){
    char str[100] = "    This    is my     string    ";
    printf("\"%s\"\n", trim(str));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awsomeee, This is it. Just for the clarity I compressed your function a bit so that it is more understandable for everyone who is new to c. Thank you –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 20:51

Use two pointers. The first points at the next character to read, and the second points at the location to write.

If you read two spaces in a row, don't advance the write pointer.


Another approach you may want to consider is to use strtok with " " as a delimiter.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a nice answer, but this is a homework question. If you give the full answer, what's the point? –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 11 '11 at 1:48
    
This is a very nice answer however I think BLUEPIXY used the same method to write out the code. Thanks anyway –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 20:59

You could use a string tokenizer in the first instance, and use as a delimiter a whitespace(" "). For that purpose in C you use strtok.After that you parse the output of the strtok function, and for each element, if it contains more whitespaces character, you eliminate them. Also you put each corrected element in another array. Then, all you have to do is parse the new array and add a whitespace after every element. If you fancy this idea, I can provide a code draft for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion and I think BLUEPIXY is using the same method, he used strtok function as well. Thank you –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 21:01

You could have two arrays and two counters. Each iteration you always increase your first counter, but only increase your second when the character is not a space. A table of it would look like this.

  Char   In-Pos  Out-Pos

   ' '      0      0
   ' '      1      0
   ' '      2      0
   ' '      3      0
   'T'      4      0
   'h'      5      1
   'i'      6      2
   's'      7      3
   ' '      8      4
   ' '      9      5
   ' '     10      5
   ' '     11      5
   'i'     12      5
   's'     13      6
   ' '     14      7
   'm'     15      8
   'y'     16      9
   ' '     17     10
   ' '     18     11
   ' '     19     11
   ' '     20     11
   ' '     21     11
   's'     22     11
   't'     23     12
   'r'     24     13
   'i'     25     14
   'n'     26     15
   'g'     27     16
   ' '     28     17
   ' '     29     18
   ' '     30     18
   ' '     31     18
share|improve this answer
    
I changed the table to be hopefully more clear. The idea is that you don't change anything except the In-Pos when it finds a space. So at the start, nothing gets set in the output until you get a valid character, e.g., 'T'. At the end, we never set those last spaces. –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 11 '11 at 1:39
    
Much closer, but don't forget the NUL being the last character and also there shouldn't be spaces at the end of the string. It's a good idea but the "no spaces at the end or beginning of the string" makes it more involved. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 11 '11 at 1:43
    
This is a very interesting solution but I believe it is not an entry level method for me since I have just started learning c. But thank you so much for your time –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 5:18
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char** split(const char *str, const char *delimiter, size_t *len){
    char *text, *p, *first, **array;
    int c;
    char** ret;

    *len = 0;
    text=strdup(str);//strdup not standard
    if(text==NULL) return NULL;
    for(c=0,p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL, c++)//count item
        if(c==0) first=p; //first token top

    ret=(char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*c+1);//+1 for NULL
    if(ret==NULL){
        free(text);
        return NULL;
    }
    //memmove?
    strcpy(text, str+(first-text));//skip until top token
    array=ret;
    for(p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL){
        *array++=p;
    }
    *array=NULL;
    *len=c;
    return ret;
}

void free4split(char** sa){
    char **array=sa;

    if(sa!=NULL){
        free(array[0]);//for text
        free(sa);      //for array
    }
}

int main(void){
    char str[100] = "    This    is my     string    ";
    char **words;
    size_t len=0;
    int i;

    words = split(str, " \t", &len);
    *str = '\0';
    for(i = 0;i<len-1;++i){
        strcat(str, words[i]);
        strcat(str, " ");
    }
    strcat(str, words[i]);
    printf("\"%s\"\n", str);
    free4split(words);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow Thankyou so much for all this effort it works perfectly fine and I think you are also using strtok function which is very useful and also your the pointers that you you have used such as BLUEPIXY have helped it a lot. But would'nt it be better if it wasn't this much complicated? However it just works fine and that is the matter in this case, Thank you –  scott Dec 11 '11 at 21:04

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