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This query is getting the newest videos uploaded by the user's subscriptions, its running very slow so I rewrote it to use joins but It didn't make a difference and after tinkering with it I found out that removing ORDER BY would make it run fast (however it defeats the purpose of the query).

Query:

SELECT vid. *
FROM video AS vid
INNER JOIN subscriptions AS sub ON vid.uploader = sub.subscription_id
WHERE sub.subscriber_id = '1'
AND vid.privacy = 0 AND vid.blocked <> 1 AND vid.converted = 1
ORDER BY vid.id DESC
LIMIT 8

Running explain, it would show "Using temporary; Using filesort" in subscriptions table and its slow (0.0900 seconds).

Without ORDER BY vid.id DESC it doesn't show "Using temporary; Using filesort" so its fast (0.0004 seconds) but I don't understand how the other table can affect it like this.

All the fields are indexed (privacy blocked and converted fields don't affect performance by more than 10%).

I would paste the full explain information but I can't seem to make it fit nice in the layout of this site.

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you SHOULD include index, and execution plan, try use the <pre> tag –  ajreal Dec 11 '11 at 3:03

3 Answers 3

You're limiting the query to 8 results. When you run it without an order by, it can grab the first 8 rows it comes across that pass the condition, and then hand them back. Boom, it's done.

When you use the order by, you're not asking for any 8 records. You're asking for the first 8 records in terms of vid.id. So it has to figure out which those are, and the only way to do that is to look through the entire table and compare vid.id values. That's a lot more work.

Is there actually an index on the column? If so, it may be out of date. You could try rebuilding it.

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There is an index and its a primary index, tried repairing and optimizing it and It didn't change the speed. Also using that table by itself, ordering by id is very fast. –  Shoshomiga Dec 11 '11 at 13:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Fixed it by suggesting that mysql use the primary index with USE_INDEX(PRIMARY)

SELECT vid. *
FROM video AS vid USE INDEX ( PRIMARY )
INNER JOIN subscriptions AS sub ON vid.uploader = sub.subscription_id
WHERE sub.subscriber_id = '1'
AND vid.privacy =0
AND vid.blocked <>1
AND vid.converted =1
ORDER BY vid.id DESC
LIMIT 8
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This is interesting. Any idea what it was doing before? Using a different index? –  Justin Morgan Dec 11 '11 at 17:34
    
It wasn't using an index –  Shoshomiga Dec 22 '11 at 17:50

1) don't use *, only return the fields you want

2) try putting limits on the join (I'll likely get down ranked for this answer but I don't care) In earlier versions of RDBMS you could see performance gains this way: I don't know if mySQL has the engine updates that enterprise databases do; and you too may see a gain.

3) try getting the rows you want first then ordering by them

1) OPTION 1) likely won't see a gain but incase the engines aren't optimized.

SELECT vid. [insert your fields here]
FROM video AS vid
INNER JOIN subscriptions AS sub ON vid.uploader = sub.subscription_id
and sub.subscriber_id = '1'
AND vid.privacy = 0 AND vid.blocked <> 1 AND vid.converted = 1
ORDER BY vid.id DESC

2) This second approach forces the engine to get your results unsorted first so you are dealing with a smaller subset to sort. and thus takes advantages of indexes before having to sort

Select Field Names 
from 
(    SELECT vid. [insert your fields here]
    FROM video AS vid
    INNER JOIN subscriptions AS sub ON vid.uploader = sub.subscription_id
    WHERE and sub.subscriber_id = '1'
    AND vid.privacy = 0 AND vid.blocked <> 1 AND vid.converted = 1) A
 ORDER BY A.id DESC
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That second query increases the speed by 40% but its still slow because we are now ordering rows without an index –  Shoshomiga Dec 11 '11 at 13:29
    
Never use *, always define the fields. –  zerkms Dec 21 '11 at 23:17
    
Thanks improved. –  xQbert Dec 21 '11 at 23:22

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