Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a class such as Value defined below.

template <typename T>
class Value : public ValueInterface
{
    public:
        // ...
        T getValue() const;

    private:
        T value_;
}

Can I refer to multiple Values of different types (that is, with different T types) in my code generically (to create a container, for example)? My first thought was if it's possible to somehow declare a pure abstract class from which Value can inherit:

class ValueInterface
{
    public:
        ?? getValue() const = 0;
}

template <typename T>
class Value : public ValueInterface
{
    // ...
}

std::list<ValueInterface> lst;
Value<int> i(...);
Value<char> c(...);

lst.push_back(i);
lst.push_back(c);

int vi = i.getValue();
char vc = c.getValue();

If it is not possible, could you provide an alternate solution?

share|improve this question
2  
Can you give a pseudo-code example of how you'd like to use such a feature? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 1:58
    
It's right there, in the second snippet. I need to declare a std::list to hold different Values. –  Dan Nestor Dec 11 '11 at 2:02
    
But what does that have to do with your getValue method? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 2:03
1  
In your example, you aren't using the getValue method in a polymorphic way, so I'm not sure why you want to declare it virtual. I also don't see what this has to do with the container. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 2:08
2  
You may find useful the boost::any library. –  rodrigo Dec 11 '11 at 2:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In C++ all expressions must have a type known to the compiler, but in your solution lst.begin()->getValue() would not have any particular type.

Although if you look carefully to your example you are not calling ValueInterface::getValue() anywhere, just the subclasses versions.

You can try the following:

class ValueInterface
{
  public:
    template <typename T>
    T getValue() const
    {
        return dynamic_cast< const Value<T> &>(*this).getValue();
    }
    virtual ~ValueInterface()
    { }
};

template <typename T>
class Value : public ValueInterface
{
    public:
        // ...
        T getValue() const;

    private:
        T value_;
};

Note that getValue() is not (and cannot be) virtual.

Now you can write the code from your example, but also:

int z = lst.begin()->getValue<int>();

If you use the wrong type in the getValue call then an exception std::bad_cast will be thrown.

share|improve this answer
2  
You need atleast one virtual function for dynamic_cast to work. –  Xeo Dec 11 '11 at 3:18
    
@Xeo Good point. The destructor is the best option here. Updated. –  rodrigo Dec 11 '11 at 10:58

You can't overload on return type, as that would create all sorts of ambiguities.

I'm not quite sure what you're trying to do here. I'm assuming you would iterate over blah or pick a random element from it, and then call getValue() on said element. This call could return absolutely any type: char, const void*, Value< Value< Value<const void*> > >, etc. What would you do with the result? How would you even define a variable for it?

share|improve this answer
    
A function using blah would know which elements returns what type, and would declare the variable accordingly. –  Dan Nestor Dec 11 '11 at 2:57
    
@Dan: If you have compile time knowledge of the type of variable you're using, you don't need polymorphism in the first place. –  suszterpatt Dec 12 '11 at 10:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.