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I'm just picking up android development to make a game. Touched it before, but only picked up the basics. I'm a bit confused how to set up a main loop. I've been into XNA (C#) and I love the seperated update/draw loop.

I was wondering how a typical android gameloop works? I've searched online and came across 2 methods:

public void run() {

         while (running) {

                //Method 1: update is called here 
                view.update();
                Canvas c = null;

                try {

                       c = view.getHolder().lockCanvas();

                       synchronized (view.getHolder()) {

                           //Method 2: update is called inside view.onDraw
                              view.onDraw(c);

                       }

                } finally {

                       if (c != null) {

                              view.getHolder().unlockCanvasAndPost(c);
                       }
                }
         }
   }

Let's take the updating of game entities as an example for the 2 methods:

        //METHOD1

public void onDraw(Canvas canvas)
{
    for (GameEntity entity : entities)
    {
        entity.update();
        entity.draw(canvas);
    }
}

//END METHOD 1

//METHOD 2

public void update()
{
    for (GameEntity entity : entities)
    {
        entity.update();
    }
}

public void draw(Canvas canvas)
{
    for (GameEntity entity : entities)
    {
        entity.draw(canvas);
    }
}

//END METHOD 2

Now I have no experience with threads whatsoever, so I have no idea how XNA does the update/draw loops behind the screens in xna. But using method 1, I would have to loop through all the entities twice, once for updating and another time for seperate drawing. I'm afraid this will kill the performance, but I háve seen this in samples online.

Am I missing something or am I right and is method 2 the best performance wise?

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1 Answer 1

It matters not how many times you loop since it only matters how many actions you do. And the amount of actions done are basicly the same. since the second "for" only adds an one more supposed "if" for each entety. So its not much.

But it gives you the ability to do only one of the actions and not forced to do both. for example: if I want the game to update 60 times per sec but only draw 40 fps, I can only do that in method 2. This allows you to have a more fluid game with less calculations, but only if you use it right.

If you have the darw and update happen at the same rate, then it is stupid to split them

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