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What I am trying to do is print all the possibilities of a binary number n digits long. In other words, with a 4 digit number:

0001
0010
0100
1000

..etc

To be honest, I have no idea of where to even start with this (other than I figure I'd need to use a loop, and probably an array) so any pointers in the right direction would be appreciated.

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7  
If this is homework, please add the homework tag. – Kal Dec 11 '11 at 2:10
1  
I should clarify, all possible numbers within a given range. I.E. all possibilities of a 4 digit binary. Replace 4 with whatever number. It's not homework but I am trying to teach myself java. – Smitty Dec 11 '11 at 2:14
1  
Generally people who have the motivation to teach themselves a language do not use statements like "I have no idea of where to even start". Get a book, read, try simpler tasks.. – Andrew Thompson Dec 11 '11 at 2:36
    
Thanks for your commentary, but I don't see a real need to defend myself on the internet. I was interested in understanding something, therefore I asked a question. – Smitty Dec 11 '11 at 2:45
    
No offense, but this questions show lack of understanding how computers do math. – harold Dec 11 '11 at 10:33
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Maybe you could use a recursive algorithm:

public void printBin(String soFar, int iterations) {
    if(iterations == 0) {
        System.out.println(soFar);
    }
    else {
        printBin(soFar + "0", iterations - 1);
        printBin(soFar + "1", iterations - 1);
    }
}

You would execute this like this:

printBin("", 4);

That would give you all possible binary numbers with 4 digits.

Hope this helped!

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You wouldn't really be generating numbers, but it would still produce the desired output! – eboix Dec 11 '11 at 2:18
    
Thanks for the reply, this is exactly what I'm after. Thank you. – Smitty Dec 11 '11 at 2:42

For an n-bit binary number, there are 2^n "permutations". You just need to loop over the integers from 0 to (1<<n)-1, and convert each one to binary.

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you mean loop from 0 - (2^n)-1? – ChrisWue Dec 11 '11 at 2:13
    
@Chris: Yes indeed! – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 2:14
for(int i=0; i < 128; i++){
  System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(i));
}

Adjust the max for as high as you'd like to go.

If you need the padded 0's, there was another question on that just today: Pad a binary String equal to zero ("0") with leading zeros in Java

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This won't give the desired output. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 11 '11 at 2:13
    
Since it's likely a homework exercise, this is a minor detail that can be remedied by the OP. :-) – ziesemer Dec 11 '11 at 2:14

It helps to know how many possibilities there are.

2^4 = 16, right?

It'll help to know this as well.

Here's how I'd do it:

/**
 * BinaryDemo
 * @author Michael
 * @since 12/10/11
 */
public class BinaryDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        if (args.length > 0) {
            int n = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
            int m = 1;
            for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
                m *= 2;
            }
            System.out.println("# bits  : " + n);
            System.out.println("# values: " + m);
            String format = "%" + n + "s";
            for (int i = 0; i < m; ++i) {
                System.out.println(String.format(format, Integer.toString(i, 2)));
            }

        } else {
            System.out.println("Usage: BinaryDemo <n>");
        }
    }
}
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Thank you for your help, this is very helpful and I'll be digging into this now too :) – Smitty Dec 11 '11 at 2:43

Just counting from 0 to 2n is so boring.. So let's do all numbers with 0 bits set first, then 1 bit, then 2, etc.

First output zero.
Then loop from 1 to n. At every iteration k, loop from (1<<k)-1 to -1 << (32 - k) (inclusive) using NextBitPermutation, and print the current number in binary.

Not tested because it's Sunday morning. Expected output is:

0000
0001
0010
0100
1000
0011
0101
0110
1001
1010
1100
0111
1011
1101
1110
1111
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To find all possible permutations of a given binary string(pattern) for example

The permutations of 1000 are 1000, 0100, 0010, 0001

void permutation(int no_ones, int no_zeroes, string accum){
    if(no_ones == 0){
        for(int i=0;i<no_zeroes;i++){
            accum += "0";
        }

        cout << accum << endl;
        return;
    }
    else if(no_zeroes == 0){
        for(int j=0;j<no_ones;j++){
            accum += "1";
        }

        cout << accum << endl;
        return;
    }

    permutation (no_ones - 1, no_zeroes, accum + "1");
    permutation (no_ones , no_zeroes - 1, accum + "0");
}

int main(){
    string append = "";

    //finding permutation of 11000   
    permutation(2, 6, append);  //the permutations are 

    //11000
    //10100
    //10010
    //10001
    //01100
    //01010

    cin.get(); 
}
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