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If you use gitk --all, you can see all the commits of your repo, from all branches. I want something like that except only the descendants of a given commit.

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Though manojlds' first sentence is correct, it's not the entire truth: it would be possible to kludge something which checks to see if each ref has the given commit in its ancestry, and then display history starting from those refs. –  Jefromi Dec 11 '11 at 3:44
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possible duplicate of Getting a list of all children of a given commit –  jthill Jun 15 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

I think this might do what you want. All commits in all branches, that have A as ancestor:

gitk --all --ancestry-path A..
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A commit only knows about its parent ( and hence all the way up) but has no clue about its children / descendants. You must use a notation like A..B to find it.

For example if you want to find commits in current branch since the given commit A, you can do something like this:

git rev-list A..
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gitk --all must work somehow. It seems possible to at least code it to first gitk --all and then omit every commit that doesn't have a given commit as its parent. –  Pistos Dec 11 '11 at 4:49

In short:

git log --all BRANCH~1..

In detail, with examples: This is the complete tree of a repository I just created:

$ git log --graph --oneline --decorate --all
* e3972be (HEAD, a) a-6
* 2707d79 a-5
* cdea9a7 a-4
| * 65b716e (c) c-5
| * ebe2a0e c-4
|/  
| * 2ed9abe (b) b-4
|/  
* ace558e (master) 3
* 20db61f 2
* 3923af1 1

Aside from --all, another thing is obvious: master -> HEAD:

$ git log --graph --oneline --decorate master..
* e3972be (HEAD, a) a-6
* 2707d79 a-5
* cdea9a7 a-4

So I tried combining them, and it almost got me what we wanted:

$ git log --graph --oneline --decorate --all master..
* e3972be (HEAD, a) a-6
* 2707d79 a-5
* cdea9a7 a-4
* 65b716e (c) c-5
* ebe2a0e c-4
* 2ed9abe (b) b-4

But unfortunately, this doesn't show the relationship between the branches, since the branch we're asking about was omitted. So we have to use log from the parent of master like so:

$ git log --graph --oneline --decorate --all master~1..
* e3972be (HEAD, a) a-6
* 2707d79 a-5
* cdea9a7 a-4
| * 65b716e (c) c-5
| * ebe2a0e c-4
|/  
| * 2ed9abe (b) b-4
|/  
* ace558e (master) 3

Ta-da! (I don't know if this simply didn't work in the past, but just in case: I'm on git version 1.7.1)

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I tried fiddling with variations of this, but it doesn't quite seem to show what I want [with gitk]. For example, suppose you made an intermediary child branch, and from there made 3 grandchildren branches. What would be the way to show the gitk for just that family of branches, and none of master, or anything else? –  Pistos May 13 at 19:55
    
@Pistos So using the above, I get the same output in gitk as log when I use gitk --all master.. (as opposed to git log --all master~1.. - So, to use a branch other than master, try gitk --all branchname.. (include the two dots) –  Izkata May 13 at 20:47
    
@Pistos I also now note that my comment has ended up almost the same as jsvnm's answer, except I don't quite understand --ancestry-path and why it would be necessary –  Izkata May 14 at 3:46
    
Doesn't foo.. mean foo..HEAD or such? i.e. isn't that dependent on your current branch? i.e. I want a solution that doesn't depend on the current branch being something in particular. –  Pistos May 14 at 14:11
    
@Pistos Yes, but that's why we also use --all. If you look at the final example in my answer, despite HEAD being at branch a, branches b and c are also visible because they are currently child branches of master –  Izkata May 14 at 14:45

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