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We are trying to get what the value of a DependencyProperty would be if it weren't locally set in the XAML. For instance, take this XAML...

<StackPanel Orientation="Vertical"
    TextElement.FontSize="24">

    <TextBlock Text="What size am I?"
        FontSize="{Binding FontSize, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Converter={StaticResource PercentageConverter}, ConverterParameter=0.75}" />

</StackPanel>

This of course doesn't work. What I've done instead is this...

<TextBlock Text="What size am I?"
    FontSize="{Binding (TextElement.FontSize), RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=FrameworkElement}, Converter={StaticResource PercentageConverter}, ConverterParameter=0.5}" />

...which checks the parent's value for the inherited FontSize property but that only works because FontSize does support inheritance. I'm looking for a solution for any DependencyProperty, not just ones that can be inherited.

Update

I changed the title of the question to be a little more generic as to what would be helpful to us. Specifically we'd love to be able to say 'For this specific instance of a DependencyObject, what would the value of a DependencyProperty be for each of the precedence levels?' When we query a DP, we of course get what the value after all precedence is applied. We'd love to say 'What would it be one or two levels higher?', etc.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A generic and robust solution should take into account the full rule set for DependencyProperty value precedence. I don't think that it is safe to say that if a value is not set locally, then its value would be the default value - the value instead could then be provided by a style, a trigger, etc.

I would suggest taking a look at the class DependencyPropertyHelper. This class contains a method called GetValueSource which when given a DependencyObject and a DependencyProperty will return a BaseValueSource result that tells you where the value for the property is coming from (style, style trigger, inherited, local, etc).

That being said, I think it would not be too hard to write an attached behaviour which you could use in XAML to return the "non-local" value for a specified DependencyProperty. This behaviour would check if the value source is local, and if it is clone the element, add it to the logical tree, and clear the local value. It would then read the value from the specified DependencyProperty on the clone, and set a read-only attached DependencyProperty to this value. This way you are letting the WPF property engine do the work for you.

Hope this helps!

Edit:

Here is a proof of concept for the attached behaviour. The behaviour has 2 properties:

  1. PropertyToInspectValue - The DependencyProperty who's value you wish to inspect.
  2. InspectedValue - The computed non-local value for the specified DependencyProperty.

In XAML you bind to these 2 properties (setting one, reading the other):

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel>
        <StackPanel.Resources>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">
                <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="30" />
            </Style>
            <Style x:Key="NamedStyle" TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}">
                <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="35" />
            </Style>
        </StackPanel.Resources>
        <!-- Without local value - uses default style (30)-->
        <TextBlock l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.PropertyToInspectValue="TextElement.FontSize"
                   Text="{Binding Path=(l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.InspectedValue), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
                   FontSize="15" />
        <!-- Without local value - uses named style (35)-->
        <TextBlock l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.PropertyToInspectValue="TextElement.FontSize"
                   Style="{StaticResource NamedStyle}"
                   Text="{Binding Path=(l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.InspectedValue), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
                   FontSize="15" />
    </StackPanel>
    <StackPanel TextElement.FontSize="25">
        <!-- Without local value - uses inherited value (25) -->
        <TextBlock l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.PropertyToInspectValue="TextElement.FontSize"
                   Text="{Binding Path=(l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.InspectedValue), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
                   FontSize="15" />
    </StackPanel>
    <!-- Without local value - uses default font size (11) -->
    <TextBlock l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.PropertyToInspectValue="TextElement.FontSize"
               Text="{Binding Path=(l:DependencyPropertyValueHelper.InspectedValue), RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
               FontSize="15" />
</StackPanel>

The example above will correctly show the values: 30, 35, 25, and 11. A couple of limitations in the code below is that the DependencyObject which we are inspecting must be a child of a Panel, and that currently only the Style property is copied over, but really all properties should be cloned since triggers in the style could use any property to change the value a DependencyProperty. Food for thought I guess ...

Attached Behaviour:

public static class DependencyPropertyValueHelper
{
    private static bool _isUpdating;

    #region InspectedValue Read-only Attached Dependency Property

    public static object GetInspectedValue(DependencyObject d)
    {
        return d.GetValue(InspectedValueProperty);
    }

    private static readonly DependencyPropertyKey InspectedValuePropertyKey =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttachedReadOnly("InspectedValue", typeof (object),
                                                    typeof (DependencyPropertyValueHelper),
                                                    new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null));

    public static readonly DependencyProperty InspectedValueProperty = InspectedValuePropertyKey.DependencyProperty;

    #endregion

    #region PropertyToInspect Attached Dependency Property

    public static void SetPropertyToInspectValue(DependencyObject d, DependencyProperty dependencyProperty)
    {
        d.SetValue(PropertyToInspectValueProperty, dependencyProperty);
    }

    public static DependencyProperty GetPropertyToInspectValue(DependencyObject d)
    {
        return (DependencyProperty)d.GetValue(PropertyToInspectValueProperty);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty PropertyToInspectValueProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("PropertyToInspectValue", typeof (DependencyProperty),
                                            typeof (DependencyPropertyValueHelper),
                                            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(OnPropertyToInspectValuePropertyChanged));

    #endregion

    #region Private ValueChanged Attached Dependency Property

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ValueChangedProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("ValueChanged", typeof(object),
                                            typeof(DependencyPropertyValueHelper),
                                            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(OnValuePropertyChanged));

    #endregion

    private static void OnValuePropertyChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!_isUpdating)
            DetermineNonLocalValue(d, GetPropertyToInspectValue(d));
    }

    private static void OnPropertyToInspectValuePropertyChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var dependencyProperty = (DependencyProperty) e.NewValue;
        DetermineNonLocalValue(d, dependencyProperty);

        var binding = new Binding
                          {
                              RelativeSource = new RelativeSource(RelativeSourceMode.Self),
                              Path = new PropertyPath(dependencyProperty.Name),
                          };

        BindingOperations.SetBinding(d, ValueChangedProperty, binding);
    }

    private static void DetermineNonLocalValue(DependencyObject d, DependencyProperty dependencyProperty)
    {
        var element = d as FrameworkElement;

        if (element == null)
            return;

        var valueSource = DependencyPropertyHelper.GetValueSource(element, dependencyProperty);

        if (valueSource.BaseValueSource == BaseValueSource.Local)
        {
            _isUpdating = true;

            var clonedDependencyObject = Activator.CreateInstance(element.GetType()) as FrameworkElement;
            var parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(element) as Panel;

            // Currently only works if parent is a panel
            if (parent != null)
            {
                // Copy any property which could impact the DP's value ...
                // Probably check if this is a control and copy the ControlTemplate too ...
                if (element.Style != null)
                    clonedDependencyObject.Style = element.Style;

                parent.Children.Add(clonedDependencyObject);

                // Let WPF provide us with the non-local value
                element.SetValue(InspectedValuePropertyKey, clonedDependencyObject.GetValue(dependencyProperty));

                parent.Children.Remove(clonedDependencyObject);
            }

            _isUpdating = false;
        }
        else
        {
            element.SetValue(InspectedValuePropertyKey, d.GetValue(dependencyProperty));
        }
    }
}

Edit 2

To elaborate on this approach. There is no chain of values exposed by WPF which we can inspect (or at least that I know of). The code above attempts to discover what the value would be if it was not set locally (from whatever value source: inherited, styles, triggers, etc). When it discovers this value it then populates the InspectedValue property with the result, which then can be read from.

A first attempt at this would be to:

  1. Clear the local value for the DP, store it away somewhere (e.g. using DependencyObject.ClearValue)
  2. Query the DP for its new value which we will assume is what the value would have been if it was not set locally. Record this value.
  3. Restore the original value from step 1.

This approach fails - in that during step 2 your property will not pick up values from default styles (for example) since the style has already been applied, and simply removing a local value from a random DependencyPropery does not trigger a re-application.

Another approach would be in step 2 above - remove the element from the logical tree, and then add it back (since when elements are added to the tree, WPF goes through all possible value sources to determine the value of each DP). This too fails for the same reason - you are not guaranteed that styles will be re-applied.

The attached behaviour above tries a third approach - clone an element but make sure the the property in question is not set on the clone, and then add it to the logical tree. At this point WPF will then process the element as it would have with the original element and apply a value to the DP (inherited, triggers, style, etc). We can then read its value, and store it away. As demonstrated, this approach works for common use-cases, but is not perfect since if the non-local value was coming from a Trigger using a read-only property like IsMouseOver it would not pick it up (and a deep copy of the original object state would not fix this).

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This looks very close to what we want. Didn't know about DependencyPropertyHelper! I'll definitely look into it! Does that return the 'stack' of precedence if you will? IOW, can I walk up the chain of precedence, because if I'm specifying a setter in XAML (which I am) then the XAML would be the BaseValueSource whereas I want the precedence level immediately above that. (Yes, I know this is crazy, but there really is this crazy need!) –  MarqueIV Dec 12 '11 at 18:31
    
I thought of another way to ask this... is it possible to determine what the value would be if it weren't set in XAML even though it is being set there? Again, I'd love to be able to say 'For this dependency property, what are the values at each of the precedence levels.' (Actually, I'm going to change the title for this question to that.) –  MarqueIV Dec 12 '11 at 18:34
    
If you haven't already, trying running the code above - you will see that it returns what the DP value would be if not set locally. It's not perfect but could be starting point for you. I have added some more comments above to clarify. –  F Ruffell Dec 13 '11 at 0:04

you should use the overloaded method of GetPropertyMetaData that suit best your need (that should be the one using types), and then you can retrieve the default value with... the DefaultValue property.

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I don't want the default value per se, I want the value as it would be at that point in time taking into consideration value precedence, had we not explicitly set something in XAML, but taking into consideration styles, triggers, etc. Make sense? –  MarqueIV Dec 12 '11 at 18:23

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