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I'm writing an application that runs an algorithm, but allows you to 'step through' the algorithm by pressing a button - displaying what's happening at each step.

How do I listen for events while within a method? eg, look at the code I've got.

static int proceed; 

button1Event(GtkWidget *widget)
{
    proceed = 0;

    int i = 0; 
    for (i=0; i<15; i++)  //this is our example 'algorithm'
    {

                    while (proceed ==0) continue; 

        printf("the nunmber is %d\n", i);
        proceed = 0; 

    }


}

button2Event(GtkWidget *widget)
{
    proceed = 1; 

}

This doesn't work because it's required to exit out of the button1 method before it can listen for button2 (or any other events).

I'm thinking something like in that while loop.

 while(proceed == 0)
 {
    listen_for_button_click(); 
 }

What method is that?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The "real" answer here (the one any experienced GTK+ programmer will give you) isn't one you will like perhaps: don't do this, your code is structured the wrong way.

The options include:

  • recommended: restructure the app to be event-driven instead; probably you need to keep track of your state (either a state machine or just a boolean flag) and ignore whichever button is not currently applicable.
  • you can run a recursive main loop, as in the other answer with gtk_main_iteration(); however this is quite dangerous because any UI event can happen in that loop, such as windows closing or other totally unrelated stuff. Not workable in most real apps of any size.
  • move the blocking logic to another thread and communicate via a GAsyncQueue or something along those lines (caution, this is hard-ish to get right and likely to be overkill).

I think you are going wrong here:

 while(proceed == 0)
 {
    listen_for_button_click(); 
 }

You don't want while loops like this; you just want the GTK+ main loop doing your blocking. When you get the button click, in the callback for it, then write whatever the code after this while loop would have been.

share|improve this answer
    
Righto. The advice I was given in my reddit thread was that the button1 event should just initialise a structure, that the button2 event uses to keep track of where it is, while it runs the algorithm. – dwjohnston Dec 12 '11 at 0:49
    
+1 Very well answered! This is a common design "requirement" which developers come up with. Looping in callback is generally not a good idea. Although gtk_main_iteration is used for such cases. Hmmm not quite sure how handling other unrelated events are dangerous because if user closes the window then s/he expects it to close, if you could add a little more clarity that would be great! – another.anon.coward Dec 12 '11 at 3:36
    
In a large program, you might have a lot of windows, some unrelated to what you're doing, and IO operations and timers and other kinds of things running in your event loop. So anywhere you block in the event loop, you have to deal with potentially any of that stuff happening; which may for example free or modify data structures that you're working with. A recursive event loop also flat-out keeps gtk_main_quit (or g_main_loop_quit) from quitting the program. The recursive main loop is a cooperative yield to unknown other conceptual "threads"; with no locking. It's unsafe. – Havoc P Dec 12 '11 at 15:37

You could check for pending events & handle the events in while loop in the clicked callback. Something on these lines:

button1Event(GtkWidget *widget)
{
    proceed = 0;

    int i = 0; 
    for (i=0; i<15; i++)  //this is our example 'algorithm'
    {

       while (proceed ==0)
       {
           /* Check for all pending events */
           while(gtk_events_pending())
           {
                gtk_main_iteration(); /* Handle the events */    
           }
           continue; 
       }

        printf("the nunmber is %d\n", i);
        proceed = 0; 

    }

}

This way when the events related click on the second button is added to the event queue to be handled, the check will see the events as pending and handle them & then proceed. This way your global value changes can be reflected & stepping should be possible.
Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

If you want to do it like this, the only way that comes to my mind is to create a separate thread for your algorithm and use some synchronization methods to notify that thread from within button click handlers.

GTK+ (glib, to be more specific) has its own API for threads and synchronization. As far as I know Condition variables are a standard way to implement wait-notify logic.

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