Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 4 Classes. Supplier, Customer, Employee, and Address. Any of the first 3 types can have "n" number of addresses. So the classes looks like this;

class Address 
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int ParentId { get; set; }  // NOTE: This is the FK.
    IAggregateRoot Parent { get; set; } // EXAMPLE: Supplier, Customer, Employee ..

    // rest of the address fields.
}

class Supplier : IAggregateRoot
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    virtual List<Address> Addresses { get; set; }

    // rest of the supplier details.

    AddAddress(Address address)
    {
        address.Parent = this;
        address.ParentId = this.Id;

        Addresses.Add(address);
    }
}

class Customer : IAggregateRoot
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    virtual List<Address> Addresses { get; set; }

    // rest of the customer details.

    AddAddress(Address address)
    {
        address.Parent = this;
        address.ParentId = this.Id;

        Addresses.Add(address);
    }
}

class Employee : IAggregateRoot
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    virtual List<Address> Addresses { get; set; }

    // rest of the employee details.

    AddAddress(Address address)
    {
        address.Parent = this;
        address.ParentId = this.Id;

        Addresses.Add(address);
    }
}

How to write the mapping for the Address's Parent attribute? Or a better approach/design to do this kinda scenario?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you need a parent for an address? How often do you search that direction? I'd represent it in the DB as the parents having an ID of an address. Then make three separate (probably manual) queries for the different types of parents. Otherwise you'd have to go with an inheritance hierarchy of those types that could have addresses. Are they logically related in any way in the problem domain, or is this just a code issue? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 11 '11 at 10:14
    
@MerlynMorgan-Graham I didn't want to have many Address classes for each Parent type. So, I have normalized my class diagram to have an Address class with many parent-types. If I do it in Old-School SQL Stored Procedure and IDataReader approach I can manage this, but I cannot figure out how I must write the fluent-configuration for this. No i do not want query/navigate from Address to Parent. –  Kosalanuwan Dec 11 '11 at 10:35
    
No, your address class does not have many parent types. It has 1 parent type -- IAggregateRoot. EF will think this is a 1..N relationship, where each address has only 1 parent. –  danludwig Dec 11 '11 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How do you expect EF to solve a mapping like this in the db? Would the Address.ParentId column reference the primary key of Customer, Supplier, or Employee?

You might be able to do it if you get rid of the navigation from the Address to the IAggregateRoot. Perhaps try this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Employee>.HasMany(p => p.Addresses).WithOptional()
        .Map(d => d.MapKey("EmployeeId"));
    modelBuilder.Entity<Supplier>.HasMany(p => p.Addresses).WithOptional()
        .Map(d => d.MapKey("SupplierId"));
    modelBuilder.Entity<Customer>.HasMany(p => p.Addresses).WithOptional()
        .Map(d => d.MapKey("CustomerId"));
}
share|improve this answer

If Employee, Customer and Supplier don't share parent entity (class) and don't follow inheritance mapping you cannot do that. Your address must have separate relation for each related entity as @olivehour mentioned.

share|improve this answer

From comments on the OP:

I didn't want to have many Address classes for each Parent type. No I do not want query/navigate from Address to Parent.

Is there something in your domain logic or user workflows that will make multiple parents sharing the same address a real scenario? As in, will the fact that addresses are shared ever show up in the UI in an important way unless they both log in and swap info face to face?

If not, I'm not sure it really matters if two identical addresses share the same ID or not, and I'm not sure the potential data duplication matters.

In which case I recommend KISS.

Make three separate mapping tables, don't bother with any inheritance, and call it done :)

SupplierToAddressMap:
SupplierId  AddressId

CustomerToAddressMap:
CustomerId  AddressId

EmployeeToAddressMap:
EmployeeId  AddressId
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.