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I spent a whole day trying to process some files with backslashes and spaces inside their names. No matter what I do awk (gawk) refuses to print backslashes:

echo "this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\\slashes" | xargs -d'\n' -n1 -I{} bash -c 'echo "{}"; echo whatever | gawk "{printf {}}"'
this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes
gawk: {printf this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes}
gawk:                                           ^ syntax error
gawk: {printf this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes}
gawk:                                                ^ backslash not last character on line

This didn't work since the backspace gets directly into awk code.

echo "this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\\slashes" | xargs -d'\n' -n1 -I{} bash -c 'echo "{}"; echo whatever | gawk "{printf \"{}\"}"'
this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes
gawk: warning: escape sequence `\s' treated as plain `s'
this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/backslashes

This worked, but awk eats the backslash. As you can see above, echo prints it but awk doesn't.

echo "this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\\slashes" | ./escape.sh | xargs -d'\n' -n1 -I{} bash -c 'echo "{}"; echo whatever | gawk "{printf \"{}\"}"'
this/pathname/contains/spa\ ces/and/back\slashes
gawk: warning: escape sequence `\ ' treated as plain ` '
gawk: warning: escape sequence `\s' treated as plain `s'

Next I tried escaping the filenames using escape.sh

#!/bin/bash
xargs -d'\n' -n1 -I{} bash -c 'echo $(printf "%q" "{}")'

Now there's a double backslash in there but awk still complains.

echo "this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\\slashes" | ./escape.sh | xargs -d'\n' -n1 -I{} bash -c 'echo "{}"; echo whatever | gawk -v VAR=$(printf "%q" "{}") "{printf VAR}"'
this/pathname/contains/spa\ ces/and/back\slashes
gawk: ces/and/back\\slashes
gawk:        ^ syntax error
gawk: ces/and/back\\slashes
gawk:         ^ unterminated regexp

Now awk said some nonsense about some unterminated regexp.

Any ideas? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What is your expected output? –  jaypal singh Dec 11 '11 at 11:00
    
the expected output is what echo outputs: this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes –  haelix Dec 11 '11 at 12:24
    
Interesting note: with mawk I don't have the problem, only gawk; still I was trying not to rely on a specific flavor of awk –  haelix Dec 11 '11 at 12:27
    
I am not sure if I follow your question. If you just want to print \ then this works fine. [jaypal:~/Temp] awk 'BEGIN{print "this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\\slashes"}' this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes –  jaypal singh Dec 11 '11 at 12:32
    
Why are you using this xargs/shell processing? You will have problems with the backslashes only in certain circumstances: go here and search for backslash. –  Dimitre Radoulov Dec 11 '11 at 12:36

3 Answers 3

You are solving the wrong problem: Regardless of the tool, backslashes and spaces in filenames on UNIX-Systems will always mean extra work. In my opinion you should sanitize the filenames, then process them.

Try:

sed "s/ /_/g;s/\\\\/-/g"

HTH Chris

share|improve this answer
1  
Much easier to use tr ' \' '_-' than sed here. –  William Pursell Dec 11 '11 at 13:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The fix is just to double every backslash that is fed into mawk, either in the input or via variables. Like this:

# awk needs escaped backslashes
VAR=$(echo "$1" | sed -r 's:\\:\\\\:g')

mawk -v VAR="$VAR" -f "script.awk"

Therefore, if a filename containing backslashes is passed inside $1, this is how you obtain the expected result.

share|improve this answer

I don't understand why you're piping into xargs. Is that a requirement of your process? Can you do something like this:

filename='this/pathname/contains/spa ces/and/back\slashes'
awk -v "fname=$filename" 'BEGIN {print fname}'
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I need xargs, this is just a simplified example of what I'm doing. I tried handing the string to awk via a variable but it doesn't work. –  haelix Dec 12 '11 at 17:32
1  
try sharing your real problem, perhaps in a new question. You say you need xargs, but I suspect you're fixated on that rather than being open-minded to different solutions. –  glenn jackman Dec 18 '11 at 2:01

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