Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a simple mouseover effect using a combination of mouseover, mouseout, addClass, and removeClass. Basically, when the user mouses over an element, I want to apply a different border (1px dashed gray). The initial state is "1px solid white". I have a class called "highlight" which simply has "border: 1px dashed gray" in it. I want to add that class onmouseover and remove it on onmouseout but I am unable to get the effect I want unless I use !important within the "highlight" class.

share|improve this question
    
Could you show some code? –  Ólafur Waage May 11 '09 at 1:15
1  
BTW, Brian: since you're using jQuery, you may want to check out the hover event helper method: docs.jquery.com/Events/hover –  Shog9 May 11 '09 at 1:22
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It sounds as though you've got the javascript working fine as is, but it's just a problem with the specificity of your CSS rules, which is why !important makes it work.

You just have to make your highlighted css rules more specific than the non-highlighted rules.

#someItem ul li { /* Specificity = 102 */
    border-color: white;
}

.highlight { /* Specificity = 10 -- not specific enough! */
    border-color: grey;    
}

#someItem ul li.highlight { /* Specificity = 112 -- this will work */
    border-color: grey;    
}


Edit with further explanation:
Let's say the relevant parts of your HTML look like this:

<div id="someItem">
    <ul>
        <li>Item 1</li>
        <li>Item 2</li>
        <li>Item 3</li>
    </ul>
</div>

and you have this CSS:

#someItem ul li {
    border: 1px solid white;
}
.highlight {
    border-color: grey;
}

Currently, all the list items in the ul in #someItem div will have a white border, and nothing has the class highlight so nothing's grey.

Through whatever means you want (in your case a hover event in jQuery), you add a class to one of the items:

$(this).addClass('highlight');

The HTML will now look something like this:

<div id="someItem">
    <ul>
        <li>Item 1</li>
        <li class="highlight">Item 2</li>
        <li>Item 3</li>
    </ul>
</div>

So far, your Javascript and HTML are working fine, but you don't see a grey border! The problem is your CSS. When the browser is trying to decide how to style the element, it looks at all the different selectors which target an element and the styles defined in those selectors. If there are two different selectors both defining the same style (in our case, the border colour is contested), then it has to decide which style to apply and which to ignore. It does this by means of what is known as "Specificity" - that is, how specific a selector is. As outlined in the HTML Dog article, it does this by assigning a value to each part of your selector, and the one with the highest score wins. The points are:

  • element selector (eg: "ul", "li", "table") = 1 point
  • class selector (eg: ".highlight", ".active", ".menu") = 10 points
  • id selector (eg: "#someItem", "#mainContent") = 100 points

There are some more rules, eg: the keyword !important and also inline styles, but that's mostly irrelevant for this, uhh... "lesson". The only other thing you should know is that if two selectors have the same specificity, then the one defined later in the file wins.

Going back to your problem, given the CSS we had before, we can see why it's still not got a grey border:

#someItem ul li = id + element + element = 100 + 1 + 1 = 102 points
.highlight = class = 10 points

As mentioned earlier, the solution is to create a more specific selector:

#someItem ul li.highlight
   = id + element + element + class
   = 100 + 1 + 1 + 10
   = 112 points

And to answer your question in the comments, you don't need to change any of your javascript or HTML for this to work. If you break down that selector, what it's saying is:

Look for the element with id "someItem", inside that look for a ul element, and then an li element which has the class "highlight" on it.

...and now, given the simple .addClass() call that you made earlier, the li satisfies these conditions, so the border should turn grey.

share|improve this answer
    
@nickf: I think you are on to something here. How could I use the addClass method then? I altered my specificity but now, how do I reference the class in jQuery in my context? –  Brian David Berman May 11 '09 at 4:31
    
I think your jQuery is fine, just using .addClass('highlight') and .removeClass('highlight') should be all you need to do, if your CSS is constructed properly. –  nickf May 11 '09 at 5:15
    
Agreed. The most specific CSS rule will take precedence. If you set the base with "#ItemList ul li" then set the hover style with "#ItemList ul li.highlight" to guarantee higher specificity –  Cheekysoft May 11 '09 at 16:46
    
@Cheekysoft: How can you specify #ItemList ul li.highlight while using the addClass/removeClass method in jQuery? –  Brian David Berman May 12 '09 at 19:39
    
like I said, you don't need to change your Javascript at all. I'll edit the answer to explain further. –  nickf May 12 '09 at 21:33
add comment

From Jquery 1.3.3 you'll be able to do this a little simpler. There will be an enhanced version of .toggleClass() available which will be very powerful.

If you don't need to break this out into a function then from 1.3.3 you'll be able to simply do:

$(".myclass").hover(function(){ $(this).toggleClass('highlight'); });

If you're having to include !important then your highlight class may need to be more specific (see CSS Specificity).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm guessing you're using an inline style on the element for the initial style:

<style type="text/css">
  .hover { border: 1px dashed gray; } /* will never apply */
</style>

...

<!-- this style has priority over class styles! -->
<div style="border: 1px solid white"> 
...
</div>

This will override the styles applied using a class... So instead of using inline styles, just use a different initial class to apply the initial styles:

<style type="text/css">
  .normal { border: 1px solid white; }
  .hover { border: 1px dashed gray; }
</style>

...

<div class="normal">
...
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. Just to clarify for the asker, using the css() method in jquery applies inline styles. –  TM. May 11 '09 at 1:18
    
I'm not using inline styles. The original style is applied via a stylesheet with nothing applied via the tag or the css() method, yet adding another class via addClass() will NOT override a style rule already defined in the original style unless I use !important. –  Brian David Berman May 11 '09 at 3:36
    
Then make sure the rule for the original style is either less specific, or comes before the highlight style in the stylesheet. –  Shog9 May 11 '09 at 3:43
add comment

This is an example of a hover I have used:

$(".myclass").hover(jbhovershow,jbhoverhide);


jbhovershow = function () {
            $(this).addClass("jimtest");
          }; 

jbhoverhide = function () {
            $(this).removeClass("jimtest");
          }

you don't really have to break something this simple up into seperate functions.

I suspect your issue might be with a conflict in the css - try just applying your highlight class by hardcodeing it , or on a click and see if it is really working.

Hope that helps

Jim

share|improve this answer
add comment

Have you considered a pure css approach?

For example:

someClass {
    border: 1px solid white;
}

someClass:hover {
    border: 1px dashed gray;
}

The hover pseudo class will give you the behavior that you want: when the user is moused over the element, it will use the lower style, otherwise it will use the first style.

Note: as someone commented, this doesn't work for non a elements in IE. It does however work for me in Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera.

It also works for any element in IE8 and IE7 standards mode. I don't have IE6 to test with though.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work in IE6, I believe. Only a elements can have hover in it. –  Paolo Bergantino May 11 '09 at 1:18
    
@Paolo Seems to work in every browser besides IE for any element type. –  TM. May 11 '09 at 1:23
    
That's what I said...? D: –  Paolo Bergantino May 11 '09 at 1:26
    
@Paolo seems like you said two things. First you said it won't work in IE6. Then you said hover only works on a elements. Sorry for my misunderstanding, but I thought you were saying it only works for a elements in any browser, and doesn't work at all in IE6. –  TM. May 11 '09 at 1:28
1  
:hover works crossbrowser if its on an anchor tag –  Chad Scira May 11 '09 at 2:16
show 1 more comment

CSS:

div.target {
    border: 1px solid #000000;
}

div.target-hover {
    border-color: #ff0000;
}

JS:

$("div.target").hover(
    function () {
    	$(this).addClass("target-hover");
    },
    function () {
    	$(this).removeClass("target-hover");
    }
);

i usually do it this way. (allows more options)

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I am doing except in div.target-hover I have "border: 1px dashed gray". The border will not override the original unless I add !important for some reason. –  Brian David Berman May 11 '09 at 3:37
    
that's odd, how are you adding the first class to the element? –  Chad Scira May 11 '09 at 4:05
    
@Chad It's coming from a rule called "#ItemList ul li" which I have styled to have "border: 1px solid white". I have a class called "highlight" that simply has "border: 1px dashed gray" that I want to toggle. –  Brian David Berman May 11 '09 at 4:15
    
are you targeting it like this $("#ItemList ul li").hover –  Chad Scira May 11 '09 at 5:10
add comment

Or you can just do it with simple CSS by using:

#namehere { border: 1px solid #fff; }
#namehere:hover { border: 1px dashed #aaa }
share|improve this answer
1  
Not sure that is a cross-browser solution (yet), but then again, I never said it had to be. –  Brian David Berman Sep 30 '10 at 17:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.