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I'm having difficulty understanding what I expect to be a basic principle in memory management. Hopefully someone can offer an explanation that will help me better understand.

I have declared a single class variable 'slideShow'.

var slideShow:SlideShow;

function addSlideShow(e:MouseEvent):void {

    slideShow = new SlideShow();    
    addChild(slideShow);

}

function clearSlideshow (e:MouseEvent):void {

    removeChild(slideShow);

}

If I call the function addSlideShow twice, two instances of the SlideShow class will be created and added to the stage.

If I call clearSlideshow twice, only one instance is removed from the stage. The second call creates an error.

I'm thinking that each time I call addSlideShow, the variable slideShow would be overwritten with the new instance of SlideShow, therefore only one instance would ever be created. This is obviously not the case.

With that in mind, is the following the correct way to handle things, where I remove and null the slideShow variable before creating a new instance?

var slideShow:SlideShow;

function addSlideShow(e:MouseEvent):void {

try {
        removeChild(slideShow);
        slideShow = null;
    } catch (e:Error) {
        trace(e);
    }

    slideShow = new SlideShow();    
    addChild(slideShow);

}


function clearSlideshow (e:MouseEvent):void {

    try {
        removeChild(slideShow);
        slideShow = null;
    } catch (e:Error) {
        trace(e);
    }   
}

Thanks for any help you can offer.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The variable doesn't get overwritten. There is a difference between the objects you create with new and the reference slideShow which is set to point to the first slide show object and then is set to point to the second one. What's happening here, is that you don't have any direct reference to the first object anymore, so you can't remove it like you try to do. There still is a reference somewhere of course, as the object are children of the stage. So they won't be garbage collected.

Common solution is to use an array and push all instances in it, so you have a reference to remove them later.

In your case, you could also use the event's target to remove an instance.

function addSlideShow(e:MouseEvent):void {
    addChild(new SlideShow()); // don't need any explicit reference now.
}

function clearSlideshow (e:MouseEvent):void {
    if(e.target is SlideShow){
        removeChild(e.target);
    }
}
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The second call to clearSlideshow() fails because you do not have any pointer refering to the element that you want to remove:

  1. First call to addSlideShow(): You create the slideShow "A". It is being refered by the slideShow var.

  2. Second call to addSlideShow(): You create the slideShow "B". It is being refered by the slideShow var. You don't have any reference to "A" anymore since the slideShow var has been overwritten.

  3. First call to clearSlideshow(): You remove the child being pointed by slideShow, i.e. "B".

  4. Second call to clearSlideshow(): You ask to clear again the child being pointed by slideShow, i.e. "B", but this child is not present in you list of childs because it has already been removed.

If you want to be able to refer to slideShows "A" and "B", you must keep something that allows you to refer to any of them (maybe an array of slideShow).

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  • The second time you call addSlideShow, you simply lose your reference to the first SlideShow object. Nothing gets destroyed, nothing gets removed, It's for the Garbage collector to handle that.

  • However if that earlier SlideShow object was added using addChild, it still is being referenced by the parent object into which it was added, So the Garbage collector wont remove it.

  • If you need to keep track of two instances, you need to create two separate reference objects. So the best idea for multiple objects is usually an Array. Fill into the array & remove from the Array.

  • Since the parent keeps a reference to all it's children you could get away without an Array as well. Simply iterate over the .children or identify them by the getChildByName methods.

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In your first example, the first SlideShow you add isn't removed by the GC because the stage still contains a reference to it. The second call to removeChild() fails because the object you're giving as it's argument was already removed from the stage.

Your second try should do what you want, but you don't need to set slideShow to null. Since you are assigning a new object to slideShow anyway, there won't be any more references to the first instance (unless some other code you didn't show references it) and it will be removed by the GC.

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